You may purchase recordings and books at our Sources link! Each purchase helps these pages grow and stay alive! Merrry Christmas!!The Songs and the Tunes
Tradition! Tradition! Here you will find a large collection of songs in the Wassail Tradition. As you can see it is a living  tradition which has been extended in recent times. The interesting thing about tunes and the rhymes of verses is that some seem to be quite universal. By this I mean that a rhyme scheme or tune lends itself to adaptation and elaboration. Essentially, this  inspires creativity. In addition to exploring and  continuing existing tradition I hope that we can also encourage the extension of the tradition. Click Here to open a guest book where you can compose your own Wassail song. Click here to read the songs that have been composed!  You might find some of these on video clck here
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Main Menu of Wassail songs and Tunes
To translate any of our pages to your favorite language clickhere

Searching for: YWassael a Welsh Wassail song Click Here
For notation click here   For sound file  tunes click here
Yorkshire Wassail Here We come A-wassaling Bring Us In Good Ale Steeleye Span Wassail Southrups Wassail The Waysailing Bowl
Sixteenth Century Wassail Gloucestershire Wassail

Here We Come A-Whistling

 

Treecat Wassail Humboldt Wassail Wassailers
The Apple Tree Wassail


Apple Tree Wassail II

Cornish Wassail My Master and Dame, I Well Perceive

Oh! Where is the Maid

We Wish You a Merry Christmas Al Lloyd Wassail Old Fox I
Let Every Man Take Off His Hat Malpas  Wassail Omnes Gentes Plaudite Gower Wassail1 
Gower Wassail 2
The Carroll for A Wassell Bowl Homeless Wassail
Wassail Out of the Milk Pail Somerset Wassail Come Bravely On, My Masters Husk Wassail Bodin Wassail Carhampton Wassailing Song:
Wassail All Over the Town Awassail Awassail Bryng Us In No Browne Bred Trunch Wassail Quote from Milton Wisselton Wasselton
Horatio Tucker Wassail Here They Come Assailing As I Sat Under A Sycamore Tree  Kentucky Wassail Filk Wassail Edwin Ace Wassail
Adderbury Wassail Song Ashen Faggot Wassail A Bonne God Wrote-Wright  The Bellman's Song
Altered by tampering :)
Here we come a Caroling
(Beware! This song is an abuse
of a Wassail song! :) 
The Merry Wassail
-song and dance
From the Cecil Sharp Collection Thomas Percy Wassail A Bone God Wrought-Husk Lucy Green Wassail Thames Head  Harleian Wassail
Wassel Bowl Carrol Carrol for Twelfth Day A Christmas Wassail Canu Cwnsela Old Fox Wassail II Heywood Sumner Wassail
Belly Wassail A Sober Spouse for Me
Beware anti-wassail content!!!
Death or Glory Wassail Cornish Wassail III A Wassail-Robin Redbreast Orkney New Year's (Wassail)
Sugar Wassail  Punch Wassail Jacobstowe Wassail EDWARD F. RIMBULT.

A Jolly Wassail Bowl,

WASSAILING Carol

Toast Cutting Butler Wassail

Dissimulation's Wassail Halse Wassail Song Anglo-Normon Carol A CARROL FOR A WASSEL-BOWL-Sandys Washington Irving (buyer beware!) Poor Robin's
Piper's Wallet  CHRISTMAS WASSAIL SONG

A Carol for the Eve of St. Mary's Day."Virginity Wassail"

 
THE WASSAIL BOWL.-Punch Satire      























 
 

Yorkshire Wassail
1.We've been a -while a wandering
Amongst the leaves so green.
But now we come a wassailing
So plainly to be seen,

For it's Christmas time, when we travel far and near;
May god bless you and  send you a happy New Year.

 2.
    We are not daily beggars
    That beg from door to door;
    We are your neighbors children,
    For we've been here before;
    For it's, etc.
                                          4.
                                             Call up the butler of this house,
                                             Likewise the mistress too,
                                             And all the little children
                                             That round the table go;
                                             For it's, etc.
 3.
    We've got a little purse;
    Made of leathern ratchin skin;
    We want a little of your money
    To line it well within;
    For it's, etc.
                                          5.
                                             Bring us out a table
                                             And spread it with a cloth,
                                             Bring us out a mouldy cheese
                                             And some of your Christmas loaf;
                                             For it's, etc.

                             6.
                               Good master and good mistress,
                               While you're sitting by the fire,
                               Pray think of us poor children
                               That's wandered in the mire;
                               For it's, etc.

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Sixteenth Century Wassail

                                                      Wassail, wassail, sing we
                                                    In worship of Christ’s nativity.

                                                    Now joy be to the Trinity,
                                                    Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,
                                                     That one God is in Trinity,
                                                   Father of heaven, of mightes most.

                                                     And joy to the Virgin pure
                                                     That ever kept her undefiled
                                                  Grounded in grace, in heart full sure,
                                                   And bare a child as maiden mild.

                                                   Bethlehem and the star so shen,
                                                  That shone three kinges for to guide,
                                                   Bear witness of this maiden clean;
                                                   The kinges three offered that tide.

                                                  And shepherds heard, as written is,
                                                  The joyful song that there was sung:
                                                        Gloria in excelsis!
                                                  With angel’s voice it was out rung.

                                                  Now joy be to the blessedful child,
                                                    And joy be to his mother dear;
                                                    Joy we all of that maiden mild,
                                                And joy have they that make good cheer.

                                                   Wassail, wassail, wassail, sing we
                                                    In worship of Christ’s nativity.

                                                         [Sixteenth century]

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The Apple Tree Wassail

                                                 Old apple tree, we'll wassail thee,
                                                 And hoping thou wilt bear.
                                                 The Lord does know where we shall be
                                                 To be merry anither year.
                                                 To blow well and to bear well,
                                                 And so merry let us be;
                                                 Let ev'ry man drink up his cup
                                                 And health to the apple tree.
 
 

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APPLE-TREE WASSAIL  II

      Lily white lily white lily white pin Please to come down and let us come in. Lily white lily white lily
      white smock Please to come down and pull back the lock.

      FOR IT"S our wassail, jolly wassail; joy come to our jolly wassail.

      How well they may bloom, how well they may bear, That we may have apples and cider next year.

      Master and mistress, oh are you within? Please to come down and let us come in.

      FOR IT"S our wassail, jolly wassail; joy come to our jolly wassail.

      How well they may bloom, how well they may bear, That we may have apples and cider next year.

      There was an old farmer that had but one cow And how to milk her, he didn't know how. He put his
      old cow all in his old barn And a little more liquor won't do us know harm.

      Harm, me boys, harm; Harm, me boys, harm; A little more liquor won't do us know harm.

      Lily white lily white lily white pin Please to come down and let us come in. Lily white lily white lily
      white smock Please to come down and pull back the lock.

      FOR IT"S our wassail, jolly wassail; joy come to our jolly wassail.

      How well they may bloom, how well they may bear, That we may have apples and cider next year.

      FOR IT"S our wassail, jolly wassail; joy come to our jolly wassail. -The Watersons

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Let every man take off his hat

                                    Let every man take off his hat
                                    And shout out to th'old apple tree
                                    Old apple tree we wassail thee
                                    And hoping thou will bear.
 
 

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Wassail, Out of the Milk Pail

    Wassail, wassail, out of the milk pail,
     Wassail, wassail as white as my nail,
     Wassail, wassail, in snow, frost and hail,
     Wassail, wassail, that much doth avail,
     Wassail, wassail, that never will fail.-1550
 

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Wassail, all over the Town,
 

Wassail, Wassail, all over the town,
 Our bread it is white and ale it is brown;
 Our bowl it is made of the green maple tree;
 In the Wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.

 Here's a health to the ox and to his right eye,
 Pray God send our master a good Christmas pie,
 A good Christmas pie as e'er I did see.
 In the Wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.

 Here's a health to the ox and to his right horn,
 Pray God send our master a good crop of corn,
 A good crop of corn as e'er I did see,
 In the Wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.

 Here's a health to the ox and to his long tail,
 Pray God send our master a good cask of ale,
 A good cask of ale as e'er I did see,
 In the Wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.

 Come, butler, come fill us a bowl of the best;
 Then I pray that your soul in heaven may rest;
 But if you do bring us a bowl of the small,
 May the Devil take butler, bowl and all!

 Then here's to the maid in the lily white smock,
 Who tripp'd to the door and slipp'd back the lock;
 Who tripp'd to the door and pull'd back the pin,
 For to let these jolly Wassailers walk in.
 
 

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Here we Come A-wassailing

                                                     Here we come a-wassailing
                                                     Among the leaves so green,
                                                     Here we come a wand'ring,
                                                        So fair to be seen.

                                                            Chorus

                                                     Love and joy come to you,
                                                      And to your wassail too,
                                             And God bless you and send you a happy new year,
                                                  And God send you a happy new year.

                                                      We are not daily beggars
                                                     Who beg from door to door,
                                                    But we are neighbor's children
                                                    Whom you have seen before.

                                                            Chorus

                                                       We have a little purse
                                                    Made of ratching leather skin;
                                                  We want some of your small change
                                                       To line it well within.

                                                            Chorus

                                                  God bless the Master of this house,
                                                     Likewise the Mistress too;
                                                      And all the little children
                                                      That round the table go.
 
 

                                                            Chorus
 
 

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Gloucestershire Wassail
 

Melody -
 

                        Wassail! wassail! all over the town,
                        Our toast it is white and our ale it is brown;
                        Our bowl it is made of the white maple treel
                        With the wassailing bowl, we'll drink to thee.

                        2. Here's to our horse, and to his right ear,
                        God send our measter a happy new year:
                        A happy new year as e'er he did see,
                        With my wassailing bowl I drink to thee.

                        3. So here is to Cherry and to his right cheek
                        Pray God send our master a good piece of beef
                        And a good piece of beef that may we all see
                        With the wassailing bowl, we'll drink to thee.

                        4. Here's to our mare, and to her right eye,
                        God send our mistress a good Christmas pie;
                        A good Christmas pie as e'er I did see,
                        With my wassailing bowl I drink to thee.

                        5. So here is to Broad Mary and to her broad horn
                        May God send our master a good crop of corn
                        And a good crop of corn that may we all see
                        With the wassailing bowl, we'll drink to thee.

                                                             6. And here is to Fillpail and to her left ear
                                                              Pray God send our master a happy New Year
                                                              And a happy New Year as e'er he did see
                                                              With the wassailing bowl, we'll drink to thee.

                                                              7. Here's to our cow, and to her long tail,
                                                              God send our measter us never may fail
                                                             Of a cup of good beer: I pray you draw near,
                                                              And our jolly wassail it's then you shall hear.

                                                              8. Come butler, come fill us a bowl of the best
                                                              Then we hope that your soul in heaven may rest
                                                              But if you do draw us a bowl of the small
                                                              Then down shall go butler, bowl and all.

                                                              9. Be here any maids? I suppose here be some;
                                                              Sure they will not let young men stand on the cold stone!
                                                              Sing hey O, maids! come trole back the pin,
                                                              And the fairest maid in the house let us all in.

                                                              10. Then here's to the maid in the lily white smock
                                                              Who tripped to the door and slipped back the lock
                                                              Who tripped to the door and pulled back the pin
                                                              For to let these jolly wassailers in.

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Thames Head Wassailer's Song

Wassail, wassail, all over the town,
Our toast is white and our ale is brown,
Our bowl it is made of a maplin tree,
And so is good beer of the best barley.

Here's to the ox, and to his long horn;
May God send our maester a good crap o'corn!
A good crap o'corn, and another o'hay,
To pass the cold wintry winds away.

Here's to the ox, and to his right ear;
May God send our maester a happy New Year!
A happy New Year, as we all may see,
With our wassailing bowl we will drink unto thee,

Here's to old Jerry, and to her right eye;
May God send our mistress a good Christmas pie!
A good Christmas pie, as we all may see,
And a wassailing bowl we will drink unto thee.

Here's to old Boxer and to his long tail;
I hope that our maester'll hae n'er a 'oss vail!
N'er a 'oss vail, as we all may see,
And a wassailing bowl we will drink unto thee.

Come pretty maidens--I suppose there are some!
Never let us poor young men stand on the cold stone;
The stones they are cold, and our shoes they are thin,
The fairest maid in the house let us come in!
Let us come in, and see how you do.

Maid:
Yes, if you will, and welcome too!

Here's to the maid, and the rosemary tree,
The ribbons are wanted and that you can see;
The ribbons are wanted, and that you can see,
With our wassailing bowl we will drink unto thee.

Now, boteler, come, fill us a bowl o' the best,
And we hope that thy sowl in heaven may rest;
But if you do bring us a bowl o' the small,
Then down shall go boteler, bowl and all,
Bowl and all, bowl and all;
Then down shall go boteler, bowl and all.

Now, master and mistress, if you are within,
Send down some of your merry, merry men,
That we may eat and drink beforethe clock strikes ten,
Our jolly wassail;
When joy comes unto our jolly wassail.
-Source: Alfred Williams, Folk -Songs of the Upper Thames., Duckworth and co., London,1923.
p.116-117.
Williams Wrote:
"I have named this the "Thames Head Wassailer's Song". because I ahve not heard it except around
the Thames source. It has been called the  "Gloucestershire Wassailing Song." though it seemsto have been quite
as popular in North Wilts as in Gloucestershire especially at Brinksworth, Somerford, Oaksey, Aston Keynes,
and Cricklade.  The bowl is variously said to have been made of a sycamore, maplin, and maypoling tree,
and there are other minor differences in the current versions. Copy obtained of "Wassail" Harvey, Cricklade, and E.
Smart, Oakse, Wilts." p.116.


The Waysailing Bowl

Oh, waysail oh, waysail all over the town.
Our pledge it is white our ale it is brown.
And our bowl it is made of the best mottling tree.
To my waysailing bowl I'll bring unto thee.

Now here's health to my master and to his right eye
Pray God send our master a good Xmas pie,
And a good Xmas pie that we may all see
To my waysailing bowl I'll bring unto thee

Now here's health to my master and to his right eear.
Pray God send our master a happy New Year.
And an happy New Year that we may all see
To my waysailing bowl I'll bring unto thee.

Now, here's health to my master and to his right arm.
Pray God send our master a good crop of corn,
And a good crop of corn and another of hay
To pass the cold wintery winds away.

Now, here's health to my master and to his right hip
Pray God send our master a good flock of sheep,
And a good flock of sheep that we may all see
To my waysailing bowl I'll bring unto thee.

Now, here's health to my master and to his right leg
Pray God send our master a good fatted pig
And a good fatted pig that we may all see
To my waysailing bowl I'lll bring unot thee.

Now butler come fill up a bowl of your best.
I hope in Heaven your soul will rest,
But if that you should bring us a bowl of your smal  (small ale)
The down shall go butler and all and all.

There was an old woman she had but one cow
And how to maintain it she did not know how
She builded a barn to keep her cow warm,
And- I'll have to have more sider - will do us no harm.

-Recorded by Gwilyn Davies in the Royal Arms Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, February 1979.
As sung by Billy Buckingham and others.
 
 
 

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Al Lloyd Wassail (Old Fox I Wassail?)

Here we come a-wassailing among the leaves so green,
Here we come a wandering so fairly to be seen.
Now is winter-time strangers travel far and near
And we wish you and send you a happy New Year

We hope that all your barley will prosper fine and grow,
So that you'll have plenty and a bit more to bestow,
We hope your wethers they grow fat and likewise all your ewes,
And where they had one lamb we hope they will have two.

Bud and blossom, bud and blossom, bud and bloom and bear,
So we may have plenty and cider all next year.
Hatfuls and in capfuls and bushel-bags and all,
And the cider running out of every gutter-hole.

Down here in the muddy lane there sits an old red fox,
Starving and a-shivering and licking his old chops.
Bring us out your table and spread it if you please,
And give us hungry wassailers a bit of bread and cheese.

I've a little purse and it's made of leather skin.
A little silver sixpences would line it well within,
Now is winter-time, strangers travel far and near,
And we wish you and send you a happy New Year

-pp96-97 A.L. Lloyd, Folksong in England.,Paladin, 1975.
Watersons= "Here we come a-wassailing"

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Old Fox Wassail 2

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For Notation click here

Down in the old lane there sits and old fox,
A-mounching and licking his dirty old chops.

Shall we go catch him my boys if we can?
Ten thousand to one if we catch him or none.

Catch im or none, catch him or none,
Ten thousand to one if we catch him or none.

Wassail, wassail all over the town,
Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown.

The great dog of Langport has burnt off his tail,
And this is the night we go singing wassail,

I will go home to old mother Joan,
And tell her to put on the big marrow bone.

Boil it, an boil it, and skim off the scum,
And we will have porridge when we do go home.

Home my boys, home, home my boys home,
And we will have porridge when we do go home.

Wassail, wassail all over the town
Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown

Spoken:
Bud, blossom, bloom and bear,
Ready to tear,
So that we shall have apples and cider next year,
At-fuls, cap-fulls, three-bushel bag-fuls,
Little heaps under the stairs,
Cider running out gutter-holes,
Hip, Hip, Hurrah.

-Noted by Cecil J. Sharp, Sung by Mr. Charles Ash, Crowcombe, Somerset, Sept. 15th, 1908, Journal of the Folk Song Scoiety,  B 1914-16, #18, Jan. 1914, 11. Wassail Song, Second Version.,pp. 28-30.

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Cornish Wassail  I
Can Wassel (Wassail Song)

This is the version (with chorus) recorded by Pete Kennedy as can Wassel or Wassail Song.
#87, p. 214 in Folksongs of Britain and Ireland.,  Peter Kennedy et. al. eds.,Oak,London,1984.
This song has a tune similar to that for Wassails Collected by Cecil Sharp: Trenerry click here
For the midi click here
Another  midi click here
 

                                     Now Christmas is comen
                                     And New Year begin
                                     Pray open your doors
                                     And let us come in.

                                     Chorus:
                                     With our wassail, wassail,
                                     Wassail, wassail,
                                     And joy come with our jolly wassail.

                                     2. O Master and Mistress
                                     Sitting down by the fire
                                    While we poor wassail boys
                                     Are traveling the mire.
                                     Chorus:

                                     3. This ancient house
                                     We will kindly salute
                                     It is an old custom
                                     You need not dispute.
                                     Chorus:

                                     4. We are here in this place,
                                     Orderly we stand
                                     We're the jolly wassail boys
                                    With a bowl in our hands.
                                     Chorus:
                                                                 

 5. We hope that your apple trees
 Will prosper and bear
 And bring forth good cider
 When we come next year.
 Chorus:

   6. We hope that your barley
Will prosper and grow
That you may have plenty
And some to bestow.
 Chorus:

7. Good Mistress and Master
How can you forbear
Come fill up out bowl
With cider or beer.
 Chorus:

 8. Good Mistress and Master
Sitting down at your ease
Put your hands in your pockets
 And give what you please.
Chorus:

 9. I wish you a blessing
And a long time to live
Since you've been so free
 And willing to give.

Chorus:

(Note:accents will be inserted shortly!)

Nadelek yu gyllys ha’n bledhen noweth ow-tos
Ygereugh darrajow h’abereveth gwren dow

Chorus:
Gans agan Wassel
Wassel, Wassel, Wassel
Lowena dh’agan jolyf Wassel

A vestres ha mester, owth-esdha yn chy
Rag dre lys ny mbyon y travalyn-ny

An chy coth ma hagar dynerghy ny a vyn
Ny res dheugh kedryna usadow us dhyn

Otta ny y’ n le-ma, yn un rew ny a sef
Mebyon Wassel fest jollyf gans cogen y’n luf

Ny a wayt agas avallennow bos spedys dhe dhon
Dry newodhow mos arta omma pan on

Ny a wayt agas barlys bos spedys yn tek
Ma ‘gas bo lanwes gans helder mar plek

A vestres ha mester, fatel yllough hepcor
Orth lenwel agan cogen a syder ha cor

A vestres ha mester, yn esedhys attes
Whyleugh agas pors ha reugh nebes, my a ‘th pys

Bennath warnough lemmyn ha bewnans fest hyr
Aban veugh mar guf h’agas helsys mar vur
 

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Wassails Collected by Cecil Sharp

Trenerry

Wassail collected from William John Trenerry (77)
Redruth 10/5/13
For midi sound click here.
The tune for this song is similar to Can Wassel click here
 

The mistress and master our wassail begin,
Pray open your door and let us come in,
   With our wassail, wassail, wassail, wassail,
   And joy come to our jolly wassail.

The mistress and master sitting down by the fire
While we poor wassailers are travelling in the mire,
   Along with...

The mistress and master sitting down at their ease
Put their hands in their pockets and give what they please
   With...

I hope that your apple trees will prosper and bear,
That we may have cider when we call next year
   With...

And where you've one hogshead I hope you'll have ten,
So that we may have cider when we call again
   With...

I hope that your barley will prosper and grow,
So that you may have some and enough to bestow
   With...

Now we poor wassail boys growing weary and old,
Drop a small bit of silver into our bowl.
   For...

I wish you a blessing and a long time to live
Since you've been so free and willing to give
   With...

-This Song appears as "Wassail Song", 56, in: Canow Kernow., Ed. Inglis Gundry.
it is listed as a Cornish Song with the following note: "On the tape-recording which Peter Kennedy made Mr. Thomas
describes how "back in old times any gang of chaps would go out on New year's Eve and scout the countryside, go from farm to farm". They used to "car a bowl with 'em-anything like a basin would do. You'd fill 'n up with cider or beer, then you'd drink around, fill'n up again".  He was "out over Helford River one night wassailing-came home four o'clock in the morning". He breaks into song again: "Come fill up the bowl with cider and beer." and then ermarks: "You can add on any words you mind to." The date given is: 1956 Sung by Joe Thomas, Constantine, Helston, 22 Nov. 1956.
For notation click here
 

Wassail Collected from William T Passmore (45) Camborne 9/5/13

There's the master and the missus sitting down by the fire
While we poor wassailers are out in the mire,
'Long with our wassail, wassail, wassail, wassail, wassail,
   And may joy come to our jolly wassail.
 

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Cornish Wassail II: Carol for the Twelfth Day
For Midi sound click here

Sweet master of the habitation
With my mistress be so kind
As to grant an invitation
If we may this favor find
To be now invited in
Then with mirth we will begin.
Happy sweet and pleasant songs which unto this time belongs.

Chorus
Let every loyal honest soul
Contribute to the wassail bowl.

So may you still enjoy the blessing
Of a loving virtuous wife,
Riches, honour still possessing
With a long and happy life,
Living in prosperity
Then let generosity
Always be maintained I pray.
Don’t forget the good old way.

Before the season is departed
In your presence we appear,
Therefore soon be noble hearted
To afford som dainty cheer
Freely let us have it now
Since the season doth allow.
What the house doth now afford
Should be plac’d upon the board

Chorus
Whether it be roast beef or fowl
And liquour well the wassel bowl.

For now it is a time of leisure,
Then to those that kindness show
May they have wealth, peace and pleasure
And the spring of bounty flow
To enrich them while they live
That they may afford to give,
To maintain the good old way
Many a long and happy day

Chorus
Let every loyal honest soul
Contribute to the wassail bowl.
 

You worthy are to be commended
 I in this you will not fail.
Now our song is almost ended
Fill our bowl with nappy ale.
Then we’ll drink a full carouse
To the master of this house
Aye and to our mistress dear
Wishing both a happy year,
In peace and love without controul
Who brought Joy to our wasel bowl.

-No. 37 from the MS belonging to Miss. Minnie Davies Gilbert and Mrs. Patience Harding, great granddaughters of the original collector. The MS of Cornish Carols wascompiled for Davies Gilbert by John Hutchens about 1826, as cited in: Canow Kernow., ed. Inglis Gundry, The Federation of Old Cornwall Societies, 1966. Pp.18-19.

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Cornish Wassail III
From the Baring Gould Collection (three Versions)
Version A

for midi sound click here

(also known as the Grampound Wassail)

1 Now here at this house we first shall begin
To drink the King's health which a custom has been
Now unto the Master we'll drink his good health
We hope he may prosper in virtue and wealth
With our wassail! Wassail! Wassail
Wassail and joy come to our jolly wassail

2 Now here at your door we do orderly stand
Our jolly wassail and our hats in our hand
We do wish a good health to the master and dame
To the children and servants we wish it the same

3 In the friendliest manner this house we salute
That it is an old custom we need not dispute
O ask not the reason from hence it did spring
For we very well know 'tis an ancient old thing

4 Now for this good liquor to us that you bring
We lift up our voices we merrily sing
That all good householders may continue still
To provide the brown liquor our bowl for to fill

5 We hope that your barley will prosper and grow
That you may have barley and beer to bestow
And where you have one bushel we hope you'll have ten
That you may have beer against we come again

6 We hope that your orchards may blossom and bear
That you may have cider against the next year
That where you've one hogshead we hope you'll have ten
That you may have cider when we come again

7 We wish you great plenty and long may you live
Because you are willing and free for to give
To our wassail so cheerful, our wassail so bold
Long may you live happy, be lusty and old

8 Now neighbours and strangers you ever shall find
The wassailers courteous, obliging and kind
We hope our civility you will approve
With a piece of small silver in token of love

9 A welcome kind Sir as we merrily meet
With our jolly wassail as we pass up the street
O welcome kind Sir, if it please you to stop
A piece of small silver in our bowl for to drop

10 Now jolly old Christmas is passing away
He's posting off from us, and this the last day
That we shall enjoy long 'o you to abide
So farewell, Old Christmas, a merry good tide

11 Now jolly old Christmas, thou welcomest guest
Thou from us are parting which makes us look wisht
For all the twelve days are now come to their end
And this the last day of the season we spend

 12 Now for this good liquor, your cider, your beer
And for the fair kindness that we have had here
We return you our thanks and shall still bear in mind
How you have been bountiful, loving and kind

13 Now for the great kindness that we did receive
We return you our thanks, and we now take our leave
From this present evening we bid you adieu
Until the next year and same season ensue

Sent by Jno Barrett, 30, Lemon St, Truro.  "At last I am able to send you the Cornish Wassail song, which I promised you a twelvemonth agone.  Mr JJ Mountford, the organist of St John's church has got the two versions of the music, one from the old man from whom I got the words, but I do not know from whence he obtained the other.  Michael Nancarrow from whom air and words were taken is a native of Grampound and is now 73 years old.  He has been singing the song for fifty years, and learnt it from Wm Griffin and Rd Darker, old men who have been dead near twenty years.  The words I send have been known in this neighbourhood as the 'Grampound 'song, being distinct from the 'Tregoney' and other versions.  The first three verses are usually sung outside the house and, before the fourth verse is sung, some liquor is supplied.  The singers carry a bowl into which all liquor given is poured, and when they leave the home they usually carry some away in case they should meet anyone on their way to the next house.  Should they do so the ninth verse is sung; verses 10 and 11 are only sung on Twelfth Day

Version B

1 Wassail, wassail all round the town
For the ale is white and the ale is brown
For 'tis our wassail, and 'tis your wassail
And 'tis joy come to our jolly wassail

2 The cup is made of the ashen tree
And the ale is made of the best barley

3 The great dog of Langport burnt his tail
The night that we went singing wassail

4 O maid, fair maid in holland smock
Come ope the door and turn the lock

5 O maid, fair maid with golden (tag)
Come ope the door, and show a pretty leg

6 O maister, mistress that sit by the fire
Consider us poor travellers in the mire

7 O maister, mistress if you do so please
Put out the brown loaf and the raw milk cheese
And then you shall see how happy we be

Somersetshire form taken down at Langport by C L Eastlake, Jan 1893
 

 Version C

1 We stand at your door and we first shall begin
To drink the Queen's health as the custom has been
And unto the master we wish a good health
And hope he may prosper in virtue and wealth
 To maintain our wassail, Wassail! Wassail! Wassail
 And joy come to our jolly wassail

2 Now here at your doors we submissively stand
With our jolly wassail And our hats in hand
We wish perfect health to both master and dame
And children and servants we wish you the same

3 In a friendly manner the house we salute
(as version A - verse 3)

4 And to the old town the same thing do we wish
We hope all good folk will not take it amiss
For us true companions who never will fail
To call at your homes with our friendly wassail

5 Come fill our old jolly bowl up to the brim
Which ever stands garnished so neat and so trim
Sometimes crowned with laurel and sometimes with bay
According to custom we'll keep the old way

6 Methinks I can smile when I look at the bowl
That just now was empty again becomes full
By the hands of good people, long may they remain
And live and continue the same to maintain

7 Now for this good liquor which to us you bring
(as version A - verse 4)

8 Now for your good liquor, your cider and beer
(as version A - verse 10)

9 We wish you great plenty and long time to live
(as version A - verse 7)

10 O may all your barley both prosper and grow
(as version A - verse 5)

11 And now we will wish you one great blessing more
That you trees may bring forth an abundance of store
As much as their stocks and their branches can bear
That you may have plenty of cider next year

12 O may all your apple trees prosper and bear
(as version A - verse 6)

13 But jolly old Christmas the merry old guest
(as version A - verse 11)

14 Now neighbours and strangers you always will find
(as version A - verse 8)

15 And for the great kindness that we have received
(as version A - verse 13)

From an old printed copy at Fowey, as sung there 60 years ago, and still sung

Vol 2 page 243 No 254

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A Wassail
Robin Redbreast Wassail

From the Baring Gould Collection

1 Gude Maister and Missus a zittin by the fire
Whilst we poor souls (Wassailers) Are dabblin in the mire
With our wassail! Our jolly wassail
And joy come to our jolly wassail

2 Little robin redbreast has a fine head
Give us a cup of cider and we'll go to bed
With our wassail etc

3 Little Robin Redbreast as a fine wing
Give us of good zider and we'll begin to sing
With our wassail etc

4 Little Robin Redbreast has a fine leg
Give us of your zider that we be come to beg
With our wassail etc

5 Little Robin Redbreast has a fine toe
Give us of your zider and we'll begin to go
With our wassail etc

6 Your ale it is white, your beer it is brown
Your zider is the very best in all our town
With our wassail etc

7 Your gin it is brew'd from juniper free
Your gin is the best that ever can be
With our wassail etc

8 Then send out your man and let us come in
Give us of your zider and to sing we will begin
With our wassail etc

As sung at Jacobstow, Nth Cornwall, sent me by Mr Batchellor and as heard from a man from (Mavis)?

No tune given

Vol 2 page 250 No 249

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West Cornwall Wassail

For the midi click here

O mistress, at your door our Wassail begins,
Pray open the door and let us come in,
 

Chorus: With our Wassail, Wassail, Wassail,Wassail,
                And Joy come to our jolly Wassail

O Mistress, at your door we kindly salute,
For it is an old custom you cannot dispute,

O mistress and Master sitting down by the fire,
While we POOR Wassail-men are travelling thro' the mire,

O Mistress and Master, sitting down at your ease,
With their hands in their pockets to give what they please

Come young men and maidens, I pray you draw near;
Come fill up our bowl with some cider or beer,

You see how we'll smile at our flowing Bowl--
Just now it is empty, by and bye it'll be full,

I wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,
A plenty of money and a barrel of beer.

I wish you a blessing and a long time to live
Because you're so free and so willing to give

I hope that your apples will prosper and grow
That you may have cider and a plenty to bestow,

I hope that your barley may prosper and grow,
That you may have beer and a plenty to bestow.
 

Well known in West Cornwall 50 or 60 years before publication in this source.  "The words which are an intersting commentaty on old Christmas and New Year customs ,wer communicated (from an old MS and from personal recollection), in 1912 by Mr. W. Dunstan of Carnon Downs, near Truro."- Source The Cornish Song Book., (Lyver Canow Kernewek).,"Part 2. Carols and Sacred Music, Ralph Dunstan, Lodenek Press, Padstow, 1974..p.52.
 

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Malpas Wassail

     Now the harvest being over
     And Christmas drawing in
     Please open your door
     And let us come in
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to our jolly wassail

     Here's the master and mistress
     Sitting down by the fire
     While we poor wassail boys
     Do trudge through the mire
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to our jolly wassail

     Here's the master and mistress
     Sitting down at their ease
     Put your hands in your pockets
     And give what you please
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to our jolly wassail

     This ancient awd house
     We will kindly salute
     It is your custom
     You need not dispute
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to our jolly wassail

     Here's the saddle and the bridle
     They're hung upon the shelf
     If you want any more
     You can it sing yourself
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to our jolly wassail

     Here's an health to the master
     And a long time to live
     Since you've been so kind
     And so willing to give
     With our wassail

     Wassail, wassail
     And joy come to
     our jolly wassail

Sung by The Watersons on the For Pence and Spicy Ale
LP, re-released on the For Pence and Spicy Ale CD.
 

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SOMERSET WASSAIL

Wassail and wassail all over the town
The cup it is white and the ale it is brown
The cup it is made of the good ashen tree
And so is the malt of the best barley

For its your wassail and its our wassail
And its joy be to you and a jolly wassail

Oh master and missus, are you all within?
Pray open the door and let us come in
O master and missus a-sitting by the fire
Pray think on us poor travelers, a traveling in the mire

Oh where is the maid with the silver-headed pin
To open the door and let us come in
Oh master and missus, it is our desire
A good loaf and cheese and a toast by the fire
There was an old man and he had an old cow
And how for to keep her he didn't know how
He built up a barn for to keep his cow warm
And a drop or two of cider will do us no harm

The girt dog of Langport he burnt his long tail
And this is the night we go singing wassail
O master and missus now we must be gone
God bless all in this house until we do come again

For midi sound file and  notation click here
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Kentucky Wassail

                    Wassail, wassail, all over the town,
                    Our cup is white and our ale is brown.
                    the cup is made from the old oak tree,
                    And the ale is made in Ken-tuck-y

                    So it's joy be to you and a jolly wassail!

                    Oh good man and good wife, are you within?
                    Pray lift the latch and let us come in.
                    We see you a-sitting at the boot o' the fire,
                    Not a-thinkin' of us in the mud and the mire.

                    So it's joy...

                    There was an old maid and she lived in a house,
                    And she had for a pet a tiny wee mouse,
                    Oh the house had a stove and the house was warm,
                    And a little bit of liquor won't do no harm.

                    So it's joy...

                    Oh a man in York drank his sack from a pail,
                    But all we ask is a wee wassail.
                    Oh, husband and wife, alack, we part,
                    God bless this house from the bottom of our heart,

                    So it's joy...
                    -- Source:Revels Songbook (ISBN 0-9640836-1-2) "collected by John Jacob Niles, arranged by Marshall Barron,
                     "some stanzas are similar to the Somerset Wassail song.." ... shares elements of the Gloucestershire Wassail.
 

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Awassail Awassail

     Awassail awassail throughout our town
     our cup it is white and our ale it is brown
     our wassail is made of the good ale and true
     some nutmeg and ginger it's the best we can brew

     Fol the dol fol the dol di dol
     fol the dol di dol fol the dol di dee
     fol the dairo fol the dardy
     sing toorilido

     our wassail is made of the elderberry bough
     and so my good neighbours we'll drink unto thou
     besides all honour you'll have apples in store
     pray let us come in for it's cold by the door

     there's a master and a mistress sitting down by the fire
     while we poor wassail boys do wait in the mire
     and so pretty maid with your silver-headed pin
     please open the door and let us come in

     we know by the moon that we are not too soon
     and we know by the sky that we are not too high
     we know by the stars that we are not too far
     and we know by the ground that we are in sound

     there's our wassail boys growing weary and cold
     drop a bit of small silver into our old bowl
     and if we're alive for another new year
     perhaps we may call and see who do live here
 

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Steeleye Span Wassail

Lyrics

A-wassail, a-wassail throughout all the town
Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown
Our wassail is made of the good ale and cake
Some nutmeg and ginger, the best we could bake

Chorus
     Fol dedol dol dedol Dol dedol dol de dol
     Fol de de ro Fol de da ri
     Sing too ra li o

Our wassail is made of the elderberry bough
And so my good neighbors we'll drink unto thou
Besides all on earth, you have apples in store
Pray let us come in for it's cold by the door

Chorus

We hope that your apple trees prosper and bear
So that we may have cider when we call next year
And where you have one barrel we hope you'll have ten
So that we may have cider when we call again

Chorus

There's a master and a mistress sitting down by the fire
While we poor wassail boys stand here in the mire
Come you pretty maid with your silver headed pin
Pray open the door and let us come in

Chorus

It's we poor wassail boys so weary and cold
Please drop some small silver into our bowl
And if we survive for another new year
Perhaps we may call and see who does live here

Chorus

We know by the moon that we are not too soon
And we know by the sky that we are not too high
And we know by the star that we are not too far
And we know by the ground that we are within sound

Chorus

From Steeleye Span's third album Ten Man Mop or Mr. Reservoir Butler Rides Again.
 A live recording from The Forum, London on September 2, 1995 was released on the CD The
Journey.

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Treecat Wassail

        We've been a - while a - sne - ak - ing
        A - mongst your clus - ter stalk
        But now we come a - bond_ - ing
        And that is caus - ing talk

        REFRAIN

           For the Peop - le all can trav - el there and here
           And no two - leg will see us for ma - ny a year

        We are quite craf - ty lurk - ers
        That flit from roof to roof
        And we are your cel - 'ry filch - ers
        Though you have - n't a - ny proof

        We've got our lit - tle car - ry nets
        Wove out of nat - 'ral* cord
        We want all of your cel - 'ry
        But do not say a word

        Call out the hun - ters of your clan
        Like - wise the sing - ers true
        Your scouts and your tool - mak - ers
        Plan - ters and kit - tens too

        Fence 'round your sprout - ing clus - ter stalk
        And cov - er it with glass
        Ring it all with trick - sy traps
        And all of that we'll pass

        Good two - leg males and fe - males
        How - ev - er you con - spire
        You'll ne - ver catch the Peop - le
        Save with your mind - glow's fire

  ? "natural" here is pronounced NATCH - rul
The Mad Irishman (sung more-or-less to the tune of Yorkshire Wassail, as annotated
by R. Vaughan Williams in Eight Traditional English Carols, 1919)

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Oh, where is the maid

     "Oh, where is the maid with the silver-headed pin
     To open the door and let us come in?
     O master and missus, it is our desire,
     A good loaf and cheese and a toast by the fire."

     Chorus
     "For it's your wassail
     And it's our wassail
     And it's joy be to you and a jolly wassail!"
 

The "silver-headed pin", which turns up in a lot of folk
songs, refers to a simple pin method of bolting a door.

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Gower Wassail I
For notation click here
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A wassail, a wassail, throughout all the town,
               Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown.
               CHORUS: Tol-de-rol-lol.

               Our wassail it is made of a good ale and cake,
               Some nutmeg and ginger, the best we could get.

               Our bowl it is made of an elbury bough,
               And now, my good master, I'll drink unto thou.

               Besides all of that, we have apples in store,
               Pray let us come in, for 'tis cold by the door.

               We know by the moon that we are not too soon,
               We know by the sky that we are not too high.

               We know by the stars that we are not too far,
               We know by the ground that we are within a sound.

               We come on a design for to taste of your ale
               Out of that li'l kinter keg that stands next to the wall

               Now master and mistress, if you are within,
               Pray send out your maid with a lily white skin

               To open the door without more delay
               Our time it is precious and we cannot stay.

               You have brought us your wassail, that's very well known.
               But we can assure you we've as good of our own.

               And as for your wassail, we care not a pin
               But for your good company you shall come in.

               Now master and mistress, thanks to you we'll give
               And for our jolly wassail, as long as we live.

               Here's a health to Old Colley, with her crooked horn,
               Pray God send our master a good crop of corn.

               Both barley and oats, and all sorts of grain,
               Pray God send our master a long life to reign.

               And if we should live 'til another New Year,
               Perhaps we may come and see who do live here.

                                    - The earliest version of the Gower Wassail? The Wassail Song in Reverend J D Davies' A History Of West Gower, 1884.
                                      (it is noted that it  was sung on New Year's Eve.)
 

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GOWER WASSAIL  II
For notation click here
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A-wassail, a-wassail throughout of this town
Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown
Our wassail is made of good ale and cake
Of nutmeg and ginger, the best we can bake

  Al dal di dal di dal
  Dal di dal di dal
  Dal di dal di dee
  Sing deero, sing daddy
  Sing too ral di do

Our wassail is made of the el'berry bough
Although my good neighbors I'll drink unto thou
Besides all on earth, we have apples to store
Pray let us come in for its cold by the door

We know by the moon that we are not too soon
And we know by the sky that we are not too high
We know by the star that we are not too far
And we know by the ground that we are within sound

Now master and mistress let your company forbear
To fill up are wassail with you cider and beer
We want none of your pale beer, nor none of your small
But a drop of your kilderkin, that's next to the wall

Now master and mistress if you are within
Pray send out your maid with her lily-white skin
For to open the door without more delay
For our time it is precious and we cannot stay

You've brought your wassail, which is very well known
But I can assure you we've as good of our own
As for your jolly wassail, we care not one pin
But its for your good company we'll let you come in

Here's a health to our Cooley and her croo'ed horn
May God send her Master a good crop of corn
Of barley and wheat and all sorts of grain
May God send her Mistress a long life to reign

Now Master and Mistress, know you will give
Unto our jolly wassail as long as you live
And if we do life to another new year
We'll call in again just to see who lives here

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Edwin Ace  Wassail
 

               A wassail, a wassail, throughout all this town,
               Our cup it is white and our ale it is brown.
               Our wassail it is made of the good ale and cake,
               Some nutmeg and ginger, the best we could bake.

               CHORUS: Fol-de-rol, lol-de-dol-de-dol, lol-de-dol-de-dol, lol-de-dol-de-day,
               Sung too-ra-li-addy, sing too-ra-li-ay.

               Our wassail is made of an elberry bough,
               Although, my good neighbour, we'll drink unto thou.
               Besides all of that, we've apples in store,
               Pray let us come in, for it's cold by the door.

               We know by the moon that we are not too soon,
               We know by the stars that we are not too far,
               We know by the sky that we are not too high.
               We know by the ground that we are within sound.

               Now master and mistress, if you are within,
               Pray send out your maid with the lilywhite skin
               For to open the door without more delay
               For our time it is precious and we cannot stay.

               We're a company designed for to taste of your ale
               Out of the kinker-gate that's next to the wall.
               We want none of your small beer, nor none of your pale
               But out of the kinker-keg that's next to the wall

                 .-recorded by Maud Karpeles, April 1928,from Mr Edwin Ace of Llangeneth
 

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Husk Wassail Song

Here we come a wassailing
Among the leaves so green,
Here we come a wandering
so fair to be seen

Our wassail cup is made
of the rosemary tree
And so is your beer
of the best barley

We are not daily beggars
Who beg from door to door,
But we are neighbors children
Whom you have seen before

Good Master and Mistress
As you sit by the fire,
Pray think of us poor children
Who are wandering in he mire

We have a little purse
Made of ratching leather skin
We want some of your small change
To line it well within

Call up the Buttler of this house.
Put on his golden ring.
Let him bring us a glass of beer and
the better we shall sing

Bring us out a table,
And spread it with a cloth;
Bring us out some mouldy cheese
And some of your Christmas loaf

God bless the Master of this house
likewise the Mistress too
 And all the little children
That round the table go

And all your kin and kinfolk
That dwell both far and near
We wish a Merry Christmas
And happy New Year.

Chorus
Love and Joy come to you and to you your wassail too
And God Bless you and send you a Happy New Year
And God send you a Happy New Year

For midi sound file and notation click here

  Husk, Song's of the Nativity, 1868 [1-8] & Ritson
 Ancient Songs and Ballads, 1829 [8-9]

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Bring Us In Good Ale

1. Bring us in no brown bread, for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread, there therein is no game;

Chorus: Bring us in good ale, and bring us in good ale;
For our Blessed Lady's sake, bring us in good ale.

2. Bring us in no beef, for there is many bones,
But bring us in good ale, for that goes down at once;
    And bring us in good ale.

3. Bring us in no bacon, for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale, and give us enough of that;
    And bring us in good ale.

4. Bring us in no mutton, for that is often lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes, for they be seldom clean;
    And bring us in good ale.

5. Bring us in no eggs, for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale, and give us nothing else;
    And bring us in good ale.

6. Bring us in no butter, for therein are many hairs;
Nor bring us in no pig's flesh, for that will make us boars;
    And bring us in good ale.

7. Bring us in no puddings, for therein is all God's good;
Nor bring us in no venison, for that is not for our blood;
    And bring us in good ale.

8. Bring us in no capon's flesh, for that is often dear;
Nor bring us in no duck's flesh, for they slobber in the mere;
    And bring us in good ale.

-Ricket, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols., 1914.

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As I Sat Under A Sycamore Tree

1. As I sat under a sycamore tree,
    a sycamore tree, a sycamore tree,
I looked me out upon the sea,
    A Christmas day in the morning.

2. I saw three ships a-sailing there,
    a-sailing there, a-sailing there,
The Virgin Mary and Christ they bear,
    A Christmas day in the morning.

3. He did whistle, and she did sing,
    she did sing, she did sing,
And all the bells on earth did ring.
    A Christmas day in the morning.

4. And now we hope to taste your cheer,
    taste your cheer, taste your cheer,
And wish you all a Happy New Year,
    A Christmas day in the morning.

-Ricket, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols., 1914.

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A Bonne God Wrote -Wright

    A bonne, God wote!
    Stickes in my throate,
Without I have a draught
    Of cornie aile,
    Nappy and staile,
My lyffe lyes in great wauste.
    Some ayle or beare,
    Gentill butlere,
Some lycourse thou hus showe,
    Such as you mashe,
    Our throtes to washe,
The best were that yow brew.

    Saint, master, and knight,
    That saint Mault hight,
Were prest betwen two stones;
    That swet humour
    Of his lycoure
Would make us sing at once.
    Mr. Wortley,
    I dar well say,
I tell you as I thinke,
    Would not, I say,
    Byd hus this day,
But that we shuld have drink.

    His men so tall
    Walkes up his hall,
With many a comly dishe;
    Of his good meat
    I cannot eate,
Without a drink i-wysse;
    Now gyve hus drink,
    And let cat wynke,
I tell you all at once,
    Yt stickes so sore,
    I may sing nomore,
Tyll I have droken once.

-Source: Thomas Wright, Specimens of Old Christmas Carols., 1841

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A Bone, God Wot!

1. A bone, God wot!
Sticks in my throat --
Without I have a draught
Of cornie ale,
Nappy and stale,
My life lies in great waste.
Some ale or beer,
Gentle butler,
Some liquor thou us show,
Such as you mash
Our throats to wash,
The best ware that you brew.

2. Saint, master, and knight,
That Saint Malt hight,
Were pressed between two stones;
That sweet humour
Of his liquor
Would make us sing at once.
Master Wortley, I dare well say,
I tell you as I think,
Would not, I say,
Bid us this day,
But that we should have drink.

3. His men so tall
Walk up his hall,
With many a comely disk;
Of his good meat
I cannot eat,
Without I drink, I wis.
Now give us drink,
And let cat wink,
I tell you all at once,
It sticks so sore,
I may sing no more,
Till I have drunken once.

This curious specimen of an ancient drinking song is contained in a manuscript written early in the sixteenth century, and preserved in the Cottonian collection in the British Museum. It bears the title of "A Christenmesse Carroll."

-Husk, W.H.,   Songs of the Nativity . London:, John Camden Hotten, 1868

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Horatio Tucker Wassail

               A wassail, a wassail, throughout all this town,
               Our jug it is white and our ale it is brown.
              Our wassail it is made of the good ale and cake,
               Some nutmeg and ginger, the best we could get.

               (no chorus).

               Our wassail is made of an elberry bough,
               Although, my good neighbour will sing unto thou.
               Besides all the others we have apples in store,
               Pray let us come in, for it's cold by the door.

               We know by the moon that we are not too soon,
               We know by the sky that we are not too high.
               We know by the stars that we are not too far,
               We know by the ground that we are within sound.

               We're a company resigned (sic) to drink of your ale
               Out of that kilderkin next to the wale.
               We want not your pale beer, nor none of your smale But a drop from the kilderkin next to the wale.

               Now master and mistress, if you are within,
               Pray send out your maid with her lilywhite skin,
               For to open the door without more delay
               Our time it is precious and we cannot stay.

               (No Chorus):

               You have brought here your wassail which is very well known,
              But I can assure you we've as good of our own.
               As for your wassail, we care not a pin
               It's your good company that we'll let you in.

               (Door opens;  wassailers go in and put some of their wassail into the bowl
               The "susan" or jug  was re-filled.  The wassailers were given gifts.):

               Here's health to Old Colley and her crooked horn,
               Pray God send her master a good crop of corn,
              Of barley and wheat, and all sorts of grain,
               Pray God send her mistress a long life to reign.

               Now master and mistress, thanks we do give
               For our jolly wassail, as long as we live.
               And if we should live 'til another New Year,
               We'll come along to see who lives here.
               -Horatio Tucker,  1957
 

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THE TRUNCH WASSAIL SONG
For notation click here
For Midi Sound click here
Here we come a wassailing all among the leaves
That isn't very easy when they're still all on the trees

Wassail, wassail, we'll tell you wassail
It comes in bottles brown and pale
Comes in bottles, so bring some here
And we'll have a happy new year

Lets us now be thankful that the old year had departed
But there's no time for feast before another one has started

Chorus

Now the year has past away, past away your sins
There's lots of lovely new ones as the year begins

Chorus
Pouring cider on the apple trees seems rather wrong
We'll drink it first and then we'll water the trees before too long

Chorus

Bring food from off your table and beer from out o' your barrel
For If you don't we'll stop and sing another ancient carol

NotationWritten by Sid and Henry Kipper,  Dambuster Re
cords. Recored on "The Ever Decreasing Circle."

Winter was a time for retreating indoors and drawing in the
horns. It was a time, as Henry recalls, of gathering round the
fire, or even round the piano, which made a bigger, more cheery
blaze, for a singling session. Many of the old carols of the
region are sadly lost, only fragments remaining of such songs as
"Oh Little Town of Grimmimgham' and Good King Wenceslas - Look
Out!," but fortunately we have in its entirety the poignant
'Trunch Wassail Song.'
The custom was for the wassailers to visit each house in the
parish, where they would sing this old carol, and demand in
return a sum of money, which was suppose to ensure good luck, it
was certainly unlucky not to pay, for then the carolers would
simply sing again.
The song is surely very ancient. Sid claims that it goes
back to Roman times, thought this is doubtful since Roman times
would have expressed in Roman numerals. The custom was more
recently associated with the Hunting of the Renoir, this being a
painting which mysteriously disappeared from the Great Hall one
New Year during a particularly riotous game of pin-the-tail-on-
the-dicky. George Kipper knowingly asserts that the search is a
waste of time.

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SOUTHRUPS WASSAIL SONG
(Kipper Family)
For Midi Sound click here
For notation click here
Version 1 of 2

All on a summer's morning from Southrups come we
To beg a cup of sugar to sweeten our tea.
If you ain't got a cup, then a half a cup will do.
And if you ain't got that, well, bugger you.

The master of this house in his rusty gold chain
Will stamp his foot and curse and bitterly complain.
He'll say he's most offended at his house we've been so bold,
And if he had his way, we'd be left out in the cold.

The missus of this house with her stockings all tore
Will soon fall asleep and loudly will snore.

The children of this house under table do run
Until they all get dizzy and fall down on the floor.
There's mud all on their rich attire and jam all on their face,
And every hair upon their head is all out of place.

The daughter of this house is a proper little whore,
She's had all the blokes round here, and twenty more.
See how the swains adore her pretty curly hair,
Until she takes it off at night, which makes them all stare.

This house and this arbor are in disrepair.
I'd live all in my cowshed as soon as I'd live there.
Your men and your maidens are rolling in the hay,
Your cattle and your sheep have all passed away.

Bad luck to this house, here the season's begun.
Where you had ten apples, may you have one.
Now we'll come no more nigh you until the next year,
And the last thing we'll do is to wish you good cheer.

Version 2of 2

All on this pleasant morning from Southrepps come we
      To ask a bag of sugar to sweeten our tea.
      If you can't spare a bag, then cupfull will do.
      And if you can't spare that, well, bugger you.

      The master of this house in his rusty old chain
      Will stamp and swear and curse and he'll bitterly complain.
      He'll say he's most offended with his house we're bein' so bold,
      And if he had his way, we'd be left out in the cold.

      The mistress of this house with her stockings all torn
      Will rant and rave and curse the very hour we were born.
      And then she'll fall asleep and loudly she will snore.
      And when her body is at peace we hope her soul's at war

      The daughter of this house is a proper little whore,
      She's had all the blokes round here, and plenty more.
      And all her little children round the table do go
      Until they all get dizzy and fall down on the floor.

      This house and this arbour are in disrepair.
      I'd live all in my pigsty as soon as I'd live there.
      Your men and your maidens are rolling in the dew,
      Unless they all take care, they'll go down with the flu.

      Bad luck to this household, the season begun.
      Where you had ten apples, may you have one.
      Now we'll come no more nigh you until the next year,
      And the last thing we'll do is to wish you good cheer.
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HUMBOLDT WASSAIL SONG

Here we come a-wassailing among the leaves so green
Although the crop is hard to find and rarely can be seen
Now is harvest time, strangers travel far and near
And we wish you and send you a spaced-out New Year.

We hope you've kept your garden free of gophers and of weeds
We hope you've kept it free of slugs and also free of seeds
We hope your plants grow tall and straight as any redwood tree
And where you have one plant, we hope you will have three.

Bud and blossom, bud and blossom, bud and bloom and bear
So you shall have plenty and a little more to spare
In hatfuls and in capfuls and in bushel bags and all
And the harvest drying on every cabin wall.

We hope that when you test your crop you do not get a cough
We hope you don't get busted and you don't get rip-ped off
We hope the dreaded whirlybirds do not intend to stay
And we wish them, and send them, a long way away.

I have a little pipe and it's made of maple wood
A little tiny bit of bud would fill it very good
Now is harvest time, strangers travel far and near
And we wish you and send you a spaced-out New Year.

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Carhampton Wassailing Song:

Old apple tree, we wassail thee,
And hoping thou wilt bear
For the Lord doth know where we shall be
Till apples come another year.
For to bear well, and to bear well
So merry let us be.
Let every man take off his hat,
And shout to the old apple tree!
Old apple tree, we wassail thee,
And hoping thou wilt bear
Hatfuls, capfuls, three bushel bagfuls
And a little heap under the stairs
Hip! Hip! Horray!

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Homeless Wassail
For midi sound file click here
For Notation click here

"Wassail, wassail all over the town
Our cup is white and our ale is brown"
But huddled on this iron grate
We poor and hungry curse our fate

No wassail bowl for such as these
No turkey scraps, no ale nor cheese
This Christmas eve our hearts' desire
Is a bottle of gin and a trashcan fire

Good Christian mind, as home you go
With dreams of holly and mistletoe,
That the holly bears a dreadful thorn
For those who wake to a frozen dawn

Oh, where is he, that heavenly child
Once born of Mary, meek and mild?
And whither peace, goodwill to men
Now and for evermore, amen?

All ye who dine with face aglow
In Reginensi atrio
Pray pause awhile at pleasure's door
And sup some sorrow with the poor

"Wassail, wassail all over the town
Our cup is white and our ale is brown"
This cold and hunger, pain and care
Sweet Jesus Christ, it's hard to bear!- Ian Robb

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Here They Come Assailing
(Sung to the tune of "Here We Come A-Wassailing")
 

Here they come assailing
The programs that are green
Here they come to change the laws
Unfair as it may seem

They're the House G.O.P.
And they will assail thee
They will mess with you
And confirm all of your fears
And confirm for you all of your fears

- Wm. K. Tong

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Bodin Wassail
                     "Wassail, wassail, wassail, wassail aye;
                            and joy come to our jolly wassail.

                            This is our merry night for choosing King and Queen;
                            The Lord lay down His life that something may be seen.
                            In our Wassail, Wassail etc....

                            We fellows are all poor can't b[u]y no house nor land;
                            Unless we do gain in our Wassail, Wassail etc....

                            Is there any butler here or dweller in this house;
                            I hope he'll take our crouse* and enter to our bowl in our   Wassail.
                            Wassail, wassail etc....
                            (* probably carousal)

                            Our Wassail bowl is full with apples and good spice;
                            The Lord lay down his life that something may be seen in our  Wassail.
                            Wassail, wassail etc....

                            So now we must be gone to seek for more good cheer;
                            As we have found it here in our Wassail.
                            Wassail, wassail etc....
 

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WE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS

We wish you a merry Christmas
We wish you a merry Christmas
We wish you a merry Christmas
And a happy New Year.

We want some figgy pudding (3x)
And a cup of good cheer.

We won't go until we get some (3x)
So bring it out here!

We wish you a Merry Christmas (3x)
And a happy New Year.

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The Carroll for a Wassell Bowl

     A jolly Wassel-Bowl
     A Wassel of good ale,
     Well fare the butler’s sole
     That setteth this to sale - Our jolly Wassel
     Good Dame, here at your door
     Our Wassel we begin
     We are all maidens pure
     We pray now let us in - With our good Wassel
     Our Wassel we do fill
     With apples and with spice
     They kindly will agree
     To take a good carouse - Of our Wassel
     But here they let us stand
     All freezing in the cold
     Good Master give command
     To enter and be bold - With our Wassel

-Source: recorded by : Mr Rann of Dudley in 1819 , in The Every-Day Book, "The
Carroll for a Wassell Bowl",Staffordshire and Warwickshire
 

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A CARROL FOR A WASSEL-BOWL,

To be sung upon Twelfth-Day at Night, to the tune of " Gallants, come away."

A jolly wassel-bowl,
A wassel of good ale,
Well fare the butler's soul,
That setteth this to sale ;
Our jolly wassel.

Good dame, here at your door
Our wassel we begin,
We are all maidens poor,
We pray now let us in,
With our wassel.

Our wassel we do fill
With apples and with spice,
Then grant us your good will
To taste here once or twice
Of our good wassel.
If any maidens be

    Here dwelling in this house.
        They kindly will agree
         To take a full carouse
         Of our wassel.

But here they let us stand
All freezing in the cold :
Good master, give command
To enter and be bold,
With our wassel.

Much joy into this hall
With us is entered in ;
Our master, first of all,
We hope will now begin
Of our wassel.

And after his good wife
Our spiced bowl will try ;
The Lord prolong your life,
Good fortune we espy
For our wassel.

Some bounty from your hands,
Our wassel to maintain:
We '1 buy no house nor lands
With that which we do gain
With our wassel.

     This is our merry night
         Of choosing king and queen,
         Then be it your delight
         That something may be seen
         In our wassel.

It is a noble part
To bear a liberal mind ;
God bless our master's heart,
For here we comfort find,
With our wassel.

And now we must be gone
To seek out more good cheer,
Where bounty will be shown,
As we have found it here,
With our wassel.

Much joy betide them all,
Our prayers shall be still,
We hope and ever shall,
For this your great good will
To our wassel.

- William Sandys, Christmas Carols, Ancient and Modern: Including the Most Popular in the West of England, and the Airs to which They are Sung. Also Specimens of French Provincial Carols. With an Introduction and Notes,R. Beckley, 1833, p.54-55.

Also in Ritson with this note:

From a collection entitled, " New Cbriftmas Carrols: " Being fit also to be sung at Easter, Whitsuntide, and  other Festival days in the year." no date, 12mo. . black letter ; in the curious study of that ever to be respected antiquary Mr. Anthony a Wood, in the Ashmoleian Museum.


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Wassailers, Bodmin

Chorus:
Oh! For singing wassail, wassail, wassail,
And jolly come to our jolly wassail

I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year
Pockets of money and a cellar of beer

Chorus

Here comes the ship out in full sail -
Ploughs the wide ocean in many a gale.

Chorus

Someimes it's laurel, sometimes it's bay,
Come fill up our bowl- dish and we'll drink away.

Chorus

If you got an apple I hope you get ten
To make some sweet cider 'gainst  (for when) we comes again

Chorus

If missus and master is sitting at ease
Put your hand in your pocket and give what you please.

Chorus

Come knock at the knocker and ring at the bell
I know you'll reward us for singing wassail

Chorus

-Recorded by Dave Bland outside a house in Bodmin, Cornwall, 6 January 1973.
 

Another version:

WASSAIL.

Several years ago, we had on Twelfth Night, the visit of poor old Tommy Climo, nicknamed Pretty Tommy, lucus a nonlucendo. Tommy was dressed in a blankctting coat, such as the Cornish tinners wear. Hanging from his neck, by a collar of listing, was his tin wassail bowl, holding some not very alluring-looking drink; made, I was told, of boiled ale, roast apples, sugar, and spice. My "goodwill " never allowed me to "taste here, once or twice of ourgood wassail," asthe song invited me. The song was. superior to the one following. I only rememberone accurately the first verse, though I have lingering echoes of the others " A Iolly Wassail-bowl,

A Wassail of good ale ;

Well fare the butler's soul,

That setteth this to sale.

Our Jolly Wassail!"

It is probably the song printed in Ellis's Brand (Bohn), vol. i., p. 5.

At night-time through all Christmas-tide, we have the visits of boys, and even men, who bring an empty wassail bowl, and sing this ruder song :— WAS-HARL.

Come, Maister and Missus; Was-hael doth begin,
Pray open your doors and let us come in,

For singing Was-hael, Was-hael,

And joy come to our Jolly Was-hael.
The Missus at the door she cannot be mute,
For 'tis an old custom you cannot dispute,

For singing Was-bael, &e.

There's Missus and Maister sitting down by the fire,
While we poor Wassailers are out in the mire,

A-singing Was-hael, Sx.

О Missus and Maister, sitting down at your ease,
Put your hands in your pockets, and give what you please.

For singing Was-hael, &c.
Come hither, you servant, come hither, my dear,
Come nil up our bowl-dish with cider or beer,

For singing Was-hael, &c.
Come hither, you servant, wherever you be,
Come fill up our bowl-dish with coffee or tea,

For singing Was-hael. &c.
Sometimes it is laurel, sometimes it is bay,
Come fill up our bowl-dish and we'll drink away,

For singing Was-hael. &o.
The roads they are dirty, our shoes аre got thin,
And we've got a bowl-dish to put money in.

For singing Was-hael, &c.
If Missus is sleepy, I hope she will wake,
To give we Was-haelers a piece of good cake

For singing Was-hael, &c.

Come knock at the knocker, and ring the door-bell,
And give us some money for singing so well,

Was-hael, &c.

We wish you Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year,
A pocket of money, and cellar of beer ;

Wos-hael, Was-hael, Was-hael,

And Joy come to our Jolly Was-hael 1

Bodmin- T. Q. C.

 

- The Western Antiquary., William Henry Kearley Wright,Latimer & son, 1884,p.164

 

 

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Wisselton Wasselton

                                    Wisselton wasselton, who lives here?
                                          We've come to taste your Christmas beer.
                                          Up the kitchen and down the hall,
                                          Holly ivy, and mistletoe
                                          A peck of apples will serve us all,
                                          Give us some apples and let us go.

                                          Up with your stocking, on with your shoe,
                                          If you haven't any apples, money will do.
                                          My carol's done, and I must be gone,
                                          No longer can I stay here.
                                          God bless you all, great and small,
                                          And send you a happy new year.

                                                                Traditional.
 

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Here We Come A'Wassailing
    by Erin Tumilty

Here we come a'wassailing
Through the convention halls
Here we come a'filking
So loud we shake the walls

<chorus>
Love and joy, do not spurn
And may Doctor Who return
And God bless you an send you
A happy new year
And God send you a happy new year

We are not common trekkers
That roam from show to show
But we are fellow whovians
Whom you already know

<chorus>

God bless the makers of the show
God bless the authors, too
And all obsessive fandom
Around the world go:

<chorus>

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Here We Come a' Caroling
       Beware This is an abuse of a wassail song!  :) Imagine that! removing the word Wassail  from its own song!  It would be of interest to find out how the words got switched! Could it be a prohibitionist tactic?  Here it is anyway,  because we want to be complete and inclusive here. However, it is not appropriate to censor alcohol from the tradition.... shame....shame.... If you run into this song please!
Contact those responsible and help them to mend their ways!

                                                    Here we come a-caroling
                                                  Among the leaves so green,
                                                   Here we come a wand'ring,
                                                       So fair to be seen.

                                                           Chorus:
                                                   Love and joy come to you,
                                                    And to your carol  too
                                         And God bless you and send you a Happy New Year,
                                              And God send you a Happy New Year.

                                                    We are not daily beggars
                                                   Who beg from door to door,
                                                 But we are neighbors' children,
                                                  Whom you have seen before.
                                                        repeat chorus

                                               God bless the Master of this house,
                                                   Likewise the Mistress too
                                                    And all the little children,
                                                    That round the table go.
                                                        repeat chorus

                                                   And all your kin and kinfolk
                                                   That dwell both far and near
                                                  We wish a Merry Christmas
                                                     And Happy New Year.
                                                        repeat chorus

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THE BELLMAN'S SONG (THE MOON SHONE BRIGHT)-Another Wassail song interfered with!
To play midi sound file click here
For Notation click here
 

The moon shone bright and the stars gave a light,
A little before 'twas day;
Our Lord he looked down on us,
And he bade us awake and pray.

Awake, awake, good people all,
Awake and you shall hear
How our dear Lord died on the cross
For us he loved so dear.

The fields were green as green could be,
When from his heavenly seat
Our mighty Lord he watered us
With his heavenly dew so sweet.

The life of man is but a span,
And cut down in an hour:
We're here today, tomorrow gone,
The creatures of an hour.

Instruct and teach your children well,
The while that you are here;
It may be better for your soul
When your corpse lies on the bier.

Today you be alive and well,
With many a thousand pound;
Tomorrow dead and cold as clay
When your corpse lies on the ground.

With one stone at your head, good man,
And another at your feet,
Your good deeds and your bad, good man,
Will both together meet.

So give your heed to what we sing,
While you're alive and sound,
It may be better for your soul,
When your corpse lies on the ground.

God bless the master of this house;
God bless the mistress here,
And all the little children
Around the table dear.

God bless you all, both great and small,
And send you a happy new year. (sung to the melody of the last 2 lines)

Recorded by the Valley Folk on "All Bells in Paradise."

A.L. Lloyd believes that this was originally a secular May
carol, which gradually collected this mass of verses at the
hands of Puritan broadside writers. That Puritans had their
hands in this version seems certain, but the last verse
appears to be that of a wassailing song. The Oxford Book of
Carols believes that the influence passed the other way -- that
lyrics from this text passed into the May carols. The first
printed version appears to have been in Sandys's "Christmas
Carols Ancient and Modern" in 1833; this was a ten-stanza
form generally similar to that used here.

The "Oxford Book" contains no less than three settings
of the song (pieces 46-48); the recording I used has still
a fourth melody.

The "Oxford Book" prints two additional stanzas:

3  O fair, O fair Jerusalem,
   When shall I come to thee?
   When shall my sorrows have an end,
   Thy joy that I may see?

5  And for the saving of our souls
   Christ died upon the cross.
   We ne'er shall do for Jesus Christ
   As he hath done for us.

If you truly wish to turn this into a Christmas piece, you can
sing stanzas 1, 2, 3, and 9, plus perhaps Stanza 5 from the "Oxford
Book," inserting this as the fourth (or second or third) verse:

And in the town of Bethlehem
A child was born that day;
His bed was in an ox's stall;
He in the manger lay.

A "bellman" is the English equivalent of a town crier; his
task was to move about the town, ringing a bell and making
public announcements.RW

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Adderbury Wassail Song

Good master and good mistress /
As you sit by the fire /
oh make me all one penny /
As much as we desire /

Chorus: all enjoy, all enjoy /
we hope you will remain, all enjoy /

A bit of you good vittals, ma'm /
and a drop of your good beer /
We wish you a merry Christmas /
We'll send you a happy new year /

Chorus: all enjoy, all enjoy /
we hope you will remain, all enjoy /
 

Sung by Shirly Collins to concertina on the album
"The Etchingham Steam Band"

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Ashen Faggot Wassail
 

Wassail and wassail and all over the town /
Our cup it is white and the ale it is brown /
The cup it is made of the good old ashen tree /
Yay, and so, the beer of the best holly /

With your wassail, ay, enjoy, come to our jolly wassail /

Oh maid, oh maid, with your silver-headed pin /
Pray open this door and let us all walk in /
All for to fill our wassail bowl and sail away again /

With your wassail, ay, enjoy, come to our jolly wassail /

Oh maid, oh maid, with your glove and your lace /
Pray come unto this door and show us your fine face /
We are truely weary of standing in this place /

With your wassail, ay, enjoy, come to our jolly wassail /

Oh master and mistress if you'd be so well a' pleased /
To set upon your table your white cloth and your cheese /
With your roast beef and your bord'rings and your pies /

With your wassail, ay, enjoy, come to our jolly wassail /

Oh master and mistress if we've done you any harm /
Pray open this door and let us all pass on /
And give us hearty thanks for a'singing of our song /

With your wassail, ay, enjoy, come to our jolly wassail /

Shirley Collins singing on "Adieu To Old England" to concertina
accompaniment. She notes that the song came from singer Sidney
Richards of Curry Rivel, Somerset, via the BBC Sound Archives.
 
 

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Canu Cwnsela
(Wassail Song)
For Notation click here
For midi sound file click here

(Mari Lwyd)=Blessed Mary
Wel,dyma nin dwad
Gyfeillion diniwad,
Wel, dym nin dwad,
Gyfeillion diniwad,
I ofyn cawn gennad,
I ofyn cawn genad, I
I ofyn cawn gennad I ganu

(Ateb)
Rhoweh glywed wyr dothion,
Pa faint ych o ddynion,
A pheth yn wch union
Yw'ch enwau?

(Mai Lwyd)
Os na chawn ni gennad
Rhowch glywed ar ganiad
Pa fodd mae'r 'madawiad
Nos heno.

(Ateb)
Does gen i ddim cinio
Nac arian i'w gwario
I wenud i chwi roeso
Nos heno

 

See, here be we coming
Six mummers a-mumming
To sing, if becoming,
Our carol

Good luck to your labours
Your pipes and your tabors;
But frist tell me, neighbours,
Who be you?

In song you must quell us,
Good fellow, or tell us
How you can compel us
To leave you!

Then Stay; but I fear, Sirs
You'll never find help here, Sirs,
Or money or beer, Sirs,
To cheer you

-English Metrical version/Sir H.I. Bell, From "Old Welsh Folk-Songs"

-Source=Caneuon Traddodiadol Y Cymry (Traditional Songs of the Welsh)., W.S. Gwynn Williams, Gwynn, LLangollen,N.Wales,1961.
"Carol or penillion sung at Christmas-tide in Gwent and Morganwg, in the old pastime called "Mari Lwyd". LLangollen (Eisteddfod) MS (1858). It was understood that the carol singers could demand food and liquor at any house where one of the inmates could not answer each of their stanzas with another. "This type of song was common all over Wales.  There is a large collection of the Anglesey ones in the British Museum.  "Mari Lwyd" was merely a S. Wales variant of a custom common throughout the country."-J.H. Davies (J.W.E.S.S., Vol.1,Part 1(1909 No.9)
Also may be  known as: Y Wassael (As soung by Iona on Nutmeg and Ginger)

Peter Kennedy records a longer and more involved song to a similar tune which he calls: "Y Feri L Wyd" The Grey Mari #69. In this version one can
really see a clear diference between Wassail and Mari Lwyd. Again the term Wassail is never mentioned and the only similarity is that folk go door to door and food and
drink are involved.-Source: Kennedy (1984)pp.158-9,172.

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Staffordshire Wassel or Thomas Percy Wassail

We have been walking among the leaves so green
And hither we are coming so stately to be seen
With our wassel, our jolly wassel
All joys come to you and to our wasel bowl

Good master and good mistress, as you sit by the fire
Remember us por wassellers that travel in the mire
With our wassel, our jolly wassel
All joys come to you and to our wassel bowl

Our bowl is made of the mulberrry tree
And soe is your ale of the best barley

Pray rise up master Butler and put on your golden ring
And bring to us a jug of ale, the better we shall sing

Our purse is made of the finest calves skin
We want a little silver to line it well within

Good Mr. X good Mist(ress)  if that you are but wiling
Send down two of your little boys each of us a shill (ing)

We'll hand a silver napkin upon a golden spear
And come no more a wassailing until another year.

-Bishop Thomas Percy, Unpublished Papers c. 1760, Harvard University Library, As
cited in: Peter Kennedy, Folksongs of Britain and Ireland, Oak, 1975 pp.231-2.
 

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Lucy Green Wassail

Here we come a-wassailing long with our Lucy Green
And here we come a-wandering as fair to be seen
Love and joy come to you and to your wassail too
And God send you a happy New Year
-Journal of the Folk-Song Society, London,1929, no. 33, p. 132.Cited in: Peter Kennedy, Folksongs of Britain and Ireland, Oak, 1975 p.232.
(In Camborne, Cornwal the caroling group went around with a young child dressed up on evergreen branches. This
child was known as " Lucy Green")
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Harleian Wassail

Bryng vs home good ale, s', bryng vs home good ale;
And for our der lady love, brynge vs home good ale.

Brynge home no beff,s', for that ys full of boyns,
But brynge home good ale Inowgh, for I love wyle yt.
But, &c.
Brynge vs home no wetyn brede, for that ys full of braund,
Nothyr no ry breede, for yt  ys of ye same.
But&c
Brynge vs home no porke, s' for yt  ys very fat,
Nethgyr no barly brede, for nethyr lovs I y
But bring vs home good ale.
Bryng vs home no mutton, s, for yt hys togh and lene,
Nethyr no trypys, for they be seldyn clene.
But bryng &c.
Bryng vs home no vele, s for yt will not dur
But bryng vs home good ale Inogh to drynke by the fyr.
But&c
Bring vs home no sydyr, nor no palde wyne,
Bor and yt do thow shalt have crysts curse and myne.
But,&c.
-Harl. MS 541 (temp. Hen. Vi.), Ritson's Ancient Songs, pp. xxxiv-v.n, as
cited in: William Sandys, Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern, London,1833.

Another Reference:

Here are two versions of one of the oldest wassail songs extant. For the antique edition I am indebted to Notes and Queries for December 1860. The modernised and fuller version appears in Mr. Chappell's Collection. It is stated that the ballad was taken from a broadside, published, without date or printer's name, about the middle of the seventeenth century.

No. I.

" Brynge us home good ale, syr, brynge us home good ale,
And for our der lady, lady love, brynge us som good ale.
Brynge us home no beff, syr, for that is full of bonys,
But brynge home goode ale y nough, for that my love alone ys:
Brynge us home no wetyn brede, for y' be ful of branne;
Nothyr of no ry brede, for y1 is of y' same;
Brynge us home no porke, syr, for y' is verie fatt;
Nothyr no barly brede, for neyther love 1 that;

Brynge us home no muton, for that is tough and lene;

Neyther no trypys, for thei be seldyn clene;

Brynge us home no veell, syr, that do I not desyr;

But brynge us home good ale y nough to drynke by y" fyer;

Brynge us home no syder, nor no palde wyne,

For and yu do thow shalt have Criste's curse and mine."

No. II.

" Bring us in no brown bread, for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread, for therein is no grain;
But bring us in good ale, and bring us in good ale,
For our blessed lady's sake, bring us in good ale.

" Bring us in no beef, for there is many bones,
But bring us in good ale, for that go'th down at once;

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no bacon, for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale, and give us enough of that.

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no mutton, for that is passing lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes, for they are seldom clean.

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no eggs, for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale, and give us nothing else.

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no butter, for there are many hairs, Nor bring us in no pig's flesh, for that will make us bears.

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no puddings, for therein is all God's good, Nor bring us in no venison, that is not for our blood.

But bring us in, &c.

" Bring us in no capon's flesh, for that is often dear, Nor bring us in no duck's flesh, for they slobber in the mere

(mire),

But bring us in good ale, and bring us in good ale,
For our blessed lady's sake, bring us in good ale."

 

-In Praise of Ale: Or, Songs, Ballads, Epigrams, & Anecdotes Relating to Beer, Malt, and Hops; with Some Curious Particulars Concerning Ale-wives and Brewers, Drinking-clubs and Customs, W. T. Marchant, G. Redway, 1888, p.77.

 

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A Carrol for a Wassel-Bowl
For midi sound click here

A jolly wassel-bowl,
A wassel of good ale,
Well fare the butler's soul,
That setteth this to sale;
Our Jolly wassel

Good dame, here at your door
Our wasel we begin,
We are all maidens poor,
We pray now let us in,
With our wassel.

Our wassel we do fill
With apples and with spice,
Then grant us your good will
To taste here once or twice
Of our good wassel

If any maidens be
Here dwelling in this house,
They kindly will agree
To take a full carouse
Of our wassel.

But here they let us stand
All freezing in the cold:
Good mastere give command
To enter and be bold,
With our wassel.

Much joy into this hall
With us is entered in;
Our master, first of all,
We hope will now begin
Of our wassel.

And after his good wife
Our spiced bowl will try;
The Lord prolong your life,
Good fortune we spy
For our wassel.

Some bounty from your hands,
Our wassel to maintain:
We'l buy no house nor lands
With that which we do gain
With our wassel.

This is our merry night
Of choosing king and queen,
Then be it your delight
That something may be seen
In our wassel.

It is a noble part
To bear a liberal mind:
God bless our master's heart,
For here we comfort find,
With our wassel.

And now we must be gone
To seek out more good cheer,
Where bounty will be shown,
As we have found it here,
With our wassel.

Much joy betide them all,
Our prayers shall be still,
We hope and ever shall,
For this your great good will
To our wassel

.- "To Be sung upon Twelfth-Day at Night, to the tune of "Gallants, come away" For Tune and notation click here
Sources: Ritson,Ancient Songs. pp.304-6, From: New Christmas Carrols:Being fit also to be sung at Easter Whitsontide, and other festival days in the year.", "in the curious study of that ever-to-be-respected antiquary Mr. Anthony a Wood, In the Ashmolean Museum, Cited in:William Sandys,Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern, London, 1833..pp.50-52.
 
 
 
 

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The Heywood Sumner Wassail Song
For midi sound click here
For Notation click here
Pray master and mistress if you are within
Leave open the door and let us come in.
For we are come with our Christmas carol.
We are come if you please to help empty your barrel.

Chorus:
Wassail, Wassail all round the town, our cup is white and our ale is brown.
Our bowl is made of a good ashen tree and here my kind fellow we drink to thee.

We are in the old time: the new time comes fast
The new time comes fast the old time is past.
So I wish you all a happy New Year
Your pockets full of money, your barrels full of beer.

We’ll drink master’s health and our mistress beside,
And all the pretty family around the fireside
And all that he has got, I know he does not mind
We’ll drink master’s health in water or in wine.

We’ll drink master’s health with the star all on his breast
And when that he is dead we hope his soul  will rest
So I wish you all a happy New Year
So I wish you all  a happy New Year.

Source: The Besom Maker., Heywood Sumner, Noorwood, 1973.
 

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The Belly Wassail
For the midi sound file click here
For Notation click here

I wish you a merry Christmas, And a Happy New Year
With a pocket full of apples and a Belly full of beer

Chorus: Moorzeal, Moorzeal Moorzeal Moorzeal

The Mistress and master sitting down by the fire
While we poor jolly sailor-boys are walking in the mire
Chorus:

In comes I little man Jack
With my wife upon my back
Chorus:

In comes I old Beelzebub,
On my shoulder I carry a club
Chorus:

The mistress and master they won't give a fig
But set down by the fire and grunt like a pig

A-wersey, A-wersey
Joy come home with Johnny Wersey
 

-First verse is from Folk Songs From Somerset, Fourth Series as an opening to a New Year Card.,
The verse with little man jack comes from a Penponds singer and was part of a St. George play.
The last verse is from Cornwall. Source: Sung by Mrs. Woolcock, Park Road, Camborne,
June 30, 1926., Noted by J. Miners and J.E. Thomas,
Journal of the Folk Song Society 8 1927-31 #33 Dec. 1929.pp.123-124.
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A Sober Spouse for Me
A fire-Side Temperance Song
(Beware! Anti-Wassail Content!)
For notation click here
For Midi Sound  click here
 
 

Some love to stroll where the wassail bowl and the wine cups circle free
None of all that band ‘ere shall win my hand
No a sober spouse for me
Where the wine cups circle free
None of all that band ere shall win my hand
No a sober spouse for me.

Like cheerful streams when the morning beams.
With him my life would flow.
Not down the crags the drunkard drags
His wife to shame and wo.
Not down the crags the drunkard drags
His wife to shame and wo.

No! No! No! No!
No! No! No! No!
No! No! No!No!
No! No! No!

Some love to stroll
Where the wassail bowl
And the wine cups circle free;
None of all that band ere shall win my hand

No! a sober spouse for me.
No! a sober spouse for me.
No!a sober spouse for me

The drunkard mark, at midnight dark
Oh! What a sight, good luck!
From fumes of beer and wine appear
Grim fiends who cross his track;
His children’s name he dooms to shame
His wife to want and wo;
She is betrayed for wine is made
Her rival and her foe

Still some will stroll where the wassail bowl
And the wine cups circle free
None of that band ere shall win my hand
No a sober spouse for me-

&c&c&c…

Words by George P Morris   Music by H. Russell
 

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The Merry Wassail Song and Dance
 
 

For midi sound file click here

The Health/The Merry Wassail

4 couple longways

Lead up a double and back; partners step and honour. Repeat.

End couples face and go back to back up and down the set, ending in middle places while middle couples cast to ends; new middles then cast to ends and return through standing
couples to the middle.

Repeat to places, new ends going back to back while original ends cast home.

Big back ring half way round (clockwise); partners step and honour. Repeat back to places (anticlockwise).

End couples face and go back to back ending in the middle while middle couples cast to ends; then original ends back ring once round.

Repeat to places with original middles forming back ring.

Partners two-hand turn 1!/2; on ends: two-hand turn half way on sides with same sex, partners set. Repeat to places.

1st man and 4th woman meet and join R hands while 2nd man and 3rd woman cast to ends, then 1st woman and 4th man meet and join R hands while 2nd woman and 3rd man cast to
ends; 1st and 4th couples R hands across once round, and keep hold until replaced.

2nd man and 3rd woman replace 1st man and 4th woman, who cast out to places, then 3rd man and 2nd woman replace 4th man and 1st woman similarly; 2nd and 3rd couples R hands
across to places.-Source: Playford

ABC Notation

X: 22
T:The Health
T:or The Merry Wassail
M:C|
L:1/4
Q:180
B Playford
K:G
B/2c/2 | "G"dd "D"d>c | "G"B G2 c/2d/2 | \
"C"ee B>c | "D4"d3 "D"A/2B/2 | \
"C"cc "D7"BA | "G"B2 "D7"A"G"G | \
"Am"AB "D7"A>G | "G"G3 :|
 
 

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Orkney New Year's Song

Many years ago the late Patrick Shuldam-Shaw taught me the "Orkney New Year's Song which seems to parallel English Wassail Songs

This is guid New Year Even's nicht
  We are a' Queen Mary's men
    And we've come here to claim oor richt
      And that’s afore oor Lady

Auld man gae tae yer ale-in-vat.  We are a'…
  And hand us here twa pints o' that.  And that's afore…

Guid wife gae tae yer pork ham
  And cut it large and cut it roond
 Be sure ye cut na your big thoom     [repeat tune for line three]

Here's tae the ane wi' the yellow hair
  She's in the hoose an' we maun hae her

I wish yer kye may a' weel thrive
  And everane a guid calf

I wish yer mares weel in their boal
  And every ain a stag foal

I wish yer hens may a' weel thrive
  And every ain lay three times five

I wish yer geese weel fae the hill
  And everane twelve at her heel

Be ye maids or be ye nane
  Ye'll a' be kissed ere we gang hame
 

I am no musician, so the only way I can give you the tune is in Tonic Solfa

t t t s t l d* -    [*this is the higher doh, the rest are low]
  m m m r d r m
s t s m r d r m
  s l s m s t r

the first two lines have a ta-ti ta-ti ta-ti taaa  rhythm
the second two go ti-ta ti-ta ti-taaa  (ti)
-Source: Ron  Shuttleworth

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Death or Glory Wassail

Wassail Wassail, we know you're about
Though you sit in the dark and pretend that you're out
If you're thinking of calling the police to give chase
Just who do you think is singing the bass

Chorus
Wassail Wassail, all over the town
We are all Wassailers of fame and renown
Open your doors and fill up our cup
Or we'll sing through your letter box until you cough up

Wassail Wassail, all over your garden
If we've done any damage then we beg your pardon
We're sorry to call upon you so late
But we had to pick the lock on your gate

Wassail Wassail, that you may believe
Tis more blessed to give than it is to receive
The more that you give the more blessed are you
The more we receive the less damage we'll do

Wassail Wassail, with a crisp ten pound note
We can all drink your health down at the Old Goat
If you haven't a tenner two fivers will do
If not things don't look very healthy for you

Wassail Wassail, all over for now
Now you've seen sense we will make no more row
Peace be upon you all at your repose
And we'll come no more nigh you until the pubs close

-Sid Kipper Source: Ron Shuttleworth
 

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A Christmas Wassail(1)

Here we coom a-wessellin(2)
Among the leaves so green,
An' here we coom a-wanderin'
So fair as to be seen.
Chorus-
 
An' to your' wessel
An' to jolly wessel,
Love an' joy be to you
An' to your wessel-tree.
 
The wessel-bob(3) is made
O' rosemary tree,
An' so is your beer
O' the best barley.
An' to your wessel, etc.
 
Weare not beggars' childeren
That begs from door to door,
But we are neighbours' childeren
That has been here before.
An' to your wessel, etc.
 
We have got a little purse
Made i' ratchin(4) leather skin,
An' we want a little money
To line it well within.
An' to your wessel, etc.
 
Bring us out your table
An' spread it wi' a cloth;
Bring us out your mouldy cheese
Likewise your Christmas loaf.
An' to your wessel, etc.
 
God bless the master o' this house,
Likewise the mistress too;
An' all the little childeren
That round the table go.
An' to your wessel, etc.
 
Good master an' good' misteress,
While you're sittin' by the fire
Pray, think of us poor childeren
That's wanderin' i' the mire.
An' to your wessel, etc.

1. From Easther and Lees, Almondbury and Huddersfield Glossary(English Dialect Society Publications, vol. 39, pp. xvii.-xviii).

2. Wassailing. 3. Wassail-bough. 4. Urchin, hedgehog. (1673-1915) and Traditional Poems Compiled with an Historical Introductionby F. W. Moorman(Professor of English Language, University of Leeds) London Published for the Yorkshire Dialect Society by Sidgwick and Jackson, Ltd., 1916, 1917

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Bryng Us In No Browne Bred

Chorus: Bryng us in good ale, and bryng us in good ale;
For owr blyssyd lady sak, bryng us in good ale.

Bryne us in no browne bred, for that is made of brane,
Nor bryng us in no whyt bred, for theriun is no game.
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no befe, for ther is many bonys,
But bryng us in good ale, for that goth downe at onys;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no bacon, for that is passyng fate,
But bryng us in god  ale, and gyfe us i-nought of tht;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no mutton, for tht is often lene,
Nor bryng us in no trypes, for thei be syldom clene;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no eggys, for ther ar many schelles,
But bryng us in good ale, and gyfe us no[th]yng ellys;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no butter, for therin ar many herys;
Nor bryng us in no pygges flesch, for that wyl make us borys;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no podynges, for therin is al Godes good;
Nor bryng us in no venesen, for that is not for owr blod;
            But bryng us in good ale.

Bryng us in no capons flesch, for tht is ofte der;
Nor bryng us in no dokes flesche, for thei slober in the mer;
            But bryng us in good ale.

-Source: Wright, Thomas, Songs and Carols Now First Printed...., 1847.

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Come Bravely On, My Masters

1642

1. Come bravely on, my masters,
For here we shall be tasters
Of curious dishes that are brave and fine;
Where they that do such cheer afford,
I'll lay my knife upon the board,
My master and my dame they do not pine.

2. Who is't will not be merry
And sing down, down-a-derry?
For now it is a time of joy and mirth;
Tis said 'tis merry in the hall
Whenas beards they do wag all;
God's plenty's here, it doth not show a dearth.

3. Let him take all lives longest,
Come fill us of the strongest,
And I will drink a health to honest John;
Come pray thee, butler, fill the bowl,
And let it round the table troll,
When that is up I'll tell you more anon.

-Ricket, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols., 1914.

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Here We Come A-Whistling

1. Here we come a-whistling, through the fields of so green;
Here we come a-singing, so fair to be seen.
 God send you happy, God send you happy,
 Pray God send you a Happy New Year!

2. The roads are very dirty, my boots are very thin,
I have a little pocket to put a penny in.
 God send you happy, God send you happy,
 Pray God send you a Happy New Year!

3. Bring out your little table and spread it with a cloth,
Bring out some of your old ale, likewise your Christmas loaf.
God send you happy, God send you happy,
 Pray God send you a Happy New Year!

4. God bless the master of this house, likewise the mistress too;
And all the little children that round the table strew.
 God send you happy, God send you happy,
 Pray God send you a Happy New Year!

-Rickert, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols., 1914.

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My Master and Dame, I Well Perceive

My master and dame, I well perceive,
Are purposed to be merry to-night,
And willingly hath given me leave
To combat with a Christmas knight.
Sir Pig, I see, comes prancing in
And bids me draw if that I dare;
I care not for his valour a pin,
For Jack of him will have a share.

My Lady Goose among the rest
Upon the table takes her place,
And piping-hot bids do my best,
And bravely looks me in the face;
For pigs and geese are gallant cheer,
God bless my master and dame therefore!
 trust before the next New Year
 To eat my part of half a score.

I likewise see good minced-pie
Here standing swaggering on the table;
The lofty walls so large and high
 I'll level down if I be able;
For they be furnished with good plums,
And spiced well with pepper and salt,
Every prune as big as both my thumbs
To drive down bravely the juice of malt.

Fill me some of your Christmas beer,
Your pepper sets my mouth on heat,
And Jack's a-dry with your good cheer,
 Give me some good ale to my meat.
And then again my stomach I'll show,
For good roast-beef here stoutly stands;
I'll make it stoop before I go,
Or I'll be no man of my hands.

And for the plenty of this house
God keep it thus well-stored alway;
Come, butler, fill me a good carouse,
And so we'll end our Christmas day.

-Rickert, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols.,1914.

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Omnes Gentes Plaudite

Omnes gentes plaudite,
I saw many birds sitting on a tree;
They took their flight and flew away,
With, Ego dixi, have good day!
Many white feathers hath the pie --
I may no more sing, my lips are so dry.
Many white feathers hath the swan --
The more that I drink, the less I can.
Lay sticks on the fire, well may it burn;
Give us once to drink ere away we turn.

-Rickert, Edith, Ancient English Christmas Carols., 1914.
 

PUNCH, OR
THE LONDON CHARIVARI. [DECEMBER 29, 1888.

THE WASSAIL BOWL.

 
Good gentles all, Christmas, like Love, is o'tf,
yet erer new :
Full eighteen hundred flying years lave left
Black Letter,
Punch here adapts to instant needs.
 Can  modern Muse do better ?

A JOLLY wassail bowl.
A wassail of good ale,
Will warm each drinker's soul.
Hail Christmas ! and all hail
His jolly wassail!


Good gentles at our door,
Our wassail we begin.
Good health to rich and poor !
You all are welcome in
To our wassail !


Our wassail we do fill
With all that's sound and nice :
We ask you with good will
To taste ; take good advice,
And our good wassail !


Without why should ye stand
All shivering in the cold ?
It is our host's command
Ye enter and make bold
With his wassail !


Much joy to this our hall
With Christmas enters in,
Punch, just to start the ball,
Will first dip beaker in
To our wassail!


He drinks good health all round,
 To little and to big,
Turn up all taps unsound,
 And try a hearty swig,
Of our wassail !
 

Drop Party Spirit quite,
All men Punch doth invite
To tipple quantum tuff :
Tis heavy, heady, stuff,
Of his wassail !
 

 Come, jovial Mr. BULL,
Our spiced bowl you '11 try,
 No head-ache by-and-by
Of stingo rare 'tis full ;
 From this wassail !
 

Coy Miss HIBEKSIA stands
 Pouting red lips—in vain.
Come, EKIN dear, join hands,
You can do nought but gain
 From our wassail !
 

Come, JONATHAN, old boss,
And fur-clad CANADA,
A right joint bumper toss !
 You won't find "bitters" pay
Like our wassail!

BISMARCK, my boy, no doubt
Our tipple is less '' stiff"
Than your champagne and stout.
But let's drown every tiff
 In our wassail !


No port South African
Or Sherry of that ilk,
You'll find therein, old man'
'Tis strong, yet mild as milk
Is our wassail!
 
And William too, we hope,
Despite satric shaft,
You'll join the genial Pope
In one deep generous draugh!
Of our wassail!
 
Boulanger-drop queer prank!--
De Lesseps-keep up heart!--
Whate'er his "flag," each Frank
Is welcome to a part,
In our wassail!
 
Russia and Turkey, too,
And Italy, and Spain,
Dutchmen--you like stiff brew!--
Come all, and take a drain
Of our wassail!
 
It is a noble part
To bear a liberal mind,
And Punch's spacious heart
Holds room for all mankind--
So drink wassail!
 
Good luck betide you all!
One bumper more we'll fill;
Punch hopes, and ever shall,
For Peace and for Good-will,
That's his wassail!

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Sugar Wassail

Collected from Vic Gammon, and John Broadwood (Sussex 1840's)

A wassail, a wassail, a wassail we begin
With sugar strands and cinnamon and all the treasures in
With a wassail, a wassail, a jolly wassail
And may joy come to you and to our wassail.

And if you any maids within your house as I suppose you've done
They'd not let us stand a-wassailing so long on this cold stone
With a wassail, a wassail, a jolly wassail
And may joy come to you and to our wassail.

We'll cut a toast from off the log and sat it by the fire
We'll wassail bees and apple trees until your heart's desire
With a wassail, a wassail, a jolly wassail
And may joy come to you and to our wassail.

Bring out your silver tankard, likewise you kissing steer
We'll come no more a-wassailing until another year
With a wassail, a wassail, a jolly wassail
And may joy come to you and to our wassail.

 

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Jacobstowe Wassail

Collected by Rev. Sabine Baring Gould, Devon/Cornwall, 19th and 20th centuries.

Wassail, wassail,
Good master and mistress, sitting down by the fire,
While we poor wassailers be dabbling in the mire,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast he has a fine wing,
Give us of your cider and we'll begin to sing,
With a jolly wassail.

Wassail, wassail,
Good master and mistress, our wassail begin,
Please open your door and let us come in,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast he has a fine song,
Give us of your cider, we won't keep you long,
With a jolly wassail.

Wassail, wassail,
Your ale cup is white and your ale it is brown,
Your beer is the best that e'er can be found,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast he has a fine leg,
Give us of your cider, and we'll begin to beg,
With a jolly wassail.

Wassail, wassail,
Your gin it is brew'd from the juniper tree,
Your gin is the best that ever can be,
With a jolly wassail.
Oh, little Robin Redbreast he has a fine toe,
Give us of your cider, and we'll begin to go,
With a jolly wassail.

Wassail, wassail,
With a jolly wassail.

 

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EDWARD F. RIMBULT
 
A wassail, a wassail, a wassail, we begin
With sugar-plum and cinnamon, and other spices in ;
With a wassail, a wassail, a jolly wassail,
And may joy come to you, and to our wassail !
 
Good master and good mistress, as yon sit by the fire,
Consider us poor wassailers who travel through the mire,
With a wassail, &c.
 
Good master and good mistress, if you will be but willing,
Come send us out your eldest son with a sixpence or a shilling,
With, a wassail, &c.
 
Good master and good mistress, if thus it should you please,
Come send us out some white loaf, likewise your Christmas cheese
With a wassail, &c.
 
Good master and good mistress, if you will so incline,
 Come send us out some roost beef, likewise your Christmas  chine,
With a wassail, &c
 
If you've any maids within your house, as I suppose you've none,
 They wouldn't let us stand a- wassailing so long on this cold stone,
With a wassail, &c.
 
For we've wassail'd all this day long, and nothing we could find,
Except an owl and an ivy bush, and ber we left behind,
With a wassail, itc. "
 
We'll cut a toast all round the loaf, and set it by the fire,
We'll wassail bees and apple trees, unto your heart's desire,
With a wassail, &c.
 
Our purses they are empty, our purses they are thin,
They lack a little silver to line them well within,
With a wassail, &c.
 
Hand out your silken kerchief upon your golden spear,
We'll come no more a- wassailing until another year,
With a wassail, &c/
 
 EDWARD F. RIMBIÜLT.
 

A SUSSEX WASSAILING SONG.
 I  took it down some few years since at Hurstpier- point in Sussex, from the ringing of an old farmer •
who had learnt it in his youth. I have since heard fragments of it in different parts of Sussex, but the present version is the most complete I have yet obtained. I may add, that a copy of it is given in Old English Songs as now sung by the Peasantry of the Weald of Surrey and Sussex. This interesting work was privately printed in 1813 by the Rev. Mr. Broadwood, and is now very rare. The tune is a jovial one in the major key, evidently of some antiquity. In Mr. Broad wood's collection the words are given to the old minor carol tune, " God rest ye, merry gentlemen " :Notes and Queries  Jan,  June  1872 p5

 
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Cinnamon and Peppermint Wassail


A wassail, a wassail, a was-hail bowl we'll sing,
With cinnamon and peppermint, and other spices in;

A wassail, a wassail, with jolly sugar'd ale,
And joy come to you from our wassail.
Good Master, and good Mistress, as you sit by the fire,
Oh, think of us poor wassailers who tramp it through the mire.
A wassail, a wassail, &c. "


We'll wassail increase to your store, we'll wassail sheep and kine,
We'll wassail bees and apple trees—we'll wassail horse and swine.
A wassail, a wassail, &c. "


Hang out your silken handkerchief upon your golden spear,
And welcome to your wassailers to taste your Christmas cheer.
A wassail, a waissail, of jolly nappy ale,
And joy come to you from our wassail.
A wassail, a wassail, a was-hail bowl we sing.
With cinnamon and peppermint and other spices in."
 

In wassailing apple trees, the tree is struck with a stick,
and all the party shout:— "


Stand fast root, bear well top,
Pray God send a good howling sop;
On every bough, twigs enow,
On every twig, apple big.
Hats full, caps full, half-quarter sacks full;
Holloh, boys, holloh!"
 

On which a horn is blown, and the whole throng hurrah
joyously.

-A history of Dorking and the neighbouring parishes,  John Shenton Brigh, 1884t

-p.282

 

 
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A Jolly Wassail Bowl

From: Wassail a Christmas Story.—Part II. [Jan.


A wassail of good ale ;
Well fare the butler's soul
That setteth this to sale.
With our wassail,
Our jolly wassail.

Our wassail we begin ;
We are all fellows poor,
We pray now let us in,
With our wassail,
Our jolly wassail.


 Good Dame, here at your door,
Our wassail we do fill
With apples and with spice ;
Then grant us your good will
To taste here once or twice
Of our wassail,
Oar jolly wassail.

If any maidens be
Here, dwelling in this house,
They kindly will agree .
To take a full carouse
Of our wassail,
Oar jolly wassail.

But here they let ns stand,
All freezing in the cold ;
Good master, give command
To enter, and be bold,
With our wassail, &c.

Much joy unto this hall
Withi us is entered in ;
Our master first of all,
We hope will now begin,
Of our wassail, &c.

And after his good wife,
Our spiced bowl will try ;
The Lord prolong your life ;
Good fortune we espy
For our wassail, &o.

Some bounty from your hands,
Oar wassail to maintain ;
We'll buy no house or lands,
With that which we do gain
With our wassail, &c.

It is a noble part,
To bear a liberal mind ;
God bless our master's heart,
For here we comfort find,
With oar wassail, &c.

And now we must be gone,
To seek out more good cheer,
Where bounty will be shown,
As we have found it here,
With our wassail, &c.

Much joy betide them all ;
Our prayers shall be still,
We hope, and ever shall,
For this your great good will
To our wassail, &c.

  -Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine Volume 91, 1862, p. 14 

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Wassailing Carol. 118


WASSAILING Carol


We wish you merry Christmas, also a glad New
Year;
We come to bring you tidings to all mankind so
dear:
We come to tell that Jesus was born in Beth-
1'em town,
And now He's gone to glory and pityingly looks
down
On us poor wassailers,
As wassailing we go;
With footsteps sore
From door to door
We trudge through sleet and snow.


A manger was His cradle, the straw it was His
bed,
The oxen were around Him within that lowly
shed;
No servants waited on Him with lords and
ladies gay;
But now He's gone to glory and unto Him to
pray.

On us poor wassailers, etc.

His mother loved and tended Him and nursed
Him at her breast,
And good old Joseph watched them both the
while they took their rest;
And wicked Herod vainly sought to rob them
of their child,
By slaughtering the Innocents in Bethlehem
undefiled.
But us poor wassailers, etc.
 

Now, all good Christian people, with great concern
we sing
These tidings of your Jesus, the Saviour, Lord
and King;
In poverty He passed His days that riches we
might share,
And of your wealth He bids you give and of
your portion spare
To us poor wassailers, etc.


Your wife shall be a fruitful vine, a hus'sif
good and able;
Your children like the olive branches round
about your table;
Your barns shall burst with plenty and your
crops shall be secure,
If you will give your charity to us who are so
poor, •
Us poor wassailers, etc.


And now no more we'll sing to you because the
hour is late,
And we must trudge and sing our song at many
another gate;
And so we'll wish you once again a merry
Christmas time,
And pray God bless you while you give good
silver for our rhyme.
Us poor wassailers, etc.

In the Yule-log Glow., Ed. Harrison Smith Morris, 1891
pp.118-115

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  Toast Cutting Butler Wassail


WASSAIL ! wassail! all over the town,
Our bread is white, and our ale it is brown
Our bowl it is made of the maplin tree,
So here, my good fellow, I'll drink to thee.
 

The wassailing bowl, with a toast within,
Come fill it up unto the brim ;
Come fill it up, so that we may all see ;
With the wassailing bowl I'll drink to thee

.
Come, butler, come bring us a bowl of your best,
And we hope your soul in Heaven will rest;
But if you do bring us a bowl of your small,
Then down shall go butler, the bowl and all.


Oh, butler! oh, butler ! now don't you be worst,
But pull out your knife and cut us a toast;
And cut us a toast, one that we may all see ;—
With the wassailing bowl I'll drink to thee.


Here's to Dobbin, and to his right eye,
God send our mistress a good Christmas pie ;
A good Christmas pie, as e'er we did see;—
With the wassailing bowl I'll drink to thee.
 

Here's to Broad May and to his broad horn,
God send our master a good crop of corn;
A good crop of corn, as we may all see,—
With the wassailing bowl I'll drink to thee.


Here's to Colly, and to her long tail,
We hope our master and mistress's heart will ne'er fail,
But bring us a bowl of your good strong beer,
And then we shall taste of your happy new year. 
 

Be there here any pretty maids ? we hope there be
some,
Don't let the jolly wassailers stand on the cold stone,
But open the door, and pull out the pin,
That we jolly wassailers may all sail in.
 

 

-Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages., Percy Society, 1848.v.23, pp.101-103.
From Chappell's Collection of ancient English Melodies, p. 161, Another version is given in Hone's Table bok, ii. 24.

 


  To return to the top click here Dissimulation,

Dissimulation's Wassail

After he has given the cup, he says:— "
The dayes of your lyfe never felt ye suche a cuppe,
So good and so holsome, if you would drynke it upp:
It passeth Malmesaye, Capryck, Tyre, or Ypocras ;
By my faythe I thynke a better drynke never was." (
Camden Society's edn., pp. 80-1.)
WASSAYLE, wassayle, out of the milke payle,
Wassayle, wassayle as whyte as my nayle,
Wassayle, wassayle in snowe, froste, and hayle,
Wassayle, wassayle with partriche and rayle,
Wassayle, wassayle that muche doth avayle,
Wassayle, wassayle that never wyll fayle.

XIII.
WASSAIL SONG.
The following is one of the oldest Wassail Songs, and is sung by
Dissimulation, personating Simon of Swynsett, in Kynge
Johau, by Bale, about 1550, when offering the poisoned cup.

C2
-Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages., Percy Society, 1848.v.23, p. 19.

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Halse Wassail Song /Also has Old Fox

"Wassail, wassail, all round the town,
 The zidur-cup is white, and the zidur is brown,
 
Our zidur is made from good apple trees,
And now, my fine fellows, we'll drink, if you please.
 
We'll drink your health with all our heart,
 We'll drink to'e all before we part,
 
Here's one, and here's two, And here's three before we goo.
 We're three jolly boys all in a row,
 
 All in a row, boys, all in a row,
And we're three jolly boys all in a row.
 
 CHORUS—, "This is our wassail, our jolly wassail,
And joy go with our jolly wassail.
 Hatfuls, capfuls, dree basket, basketfuls,
 And a little heap in under the stairs.
 
 "Down in a green copse there sits an old fox,
And there he sits a-mopping his chops.
 
Shall we go catch him, boys—say, shall we go?
 A thousand to one whor we catch him or no.
 
 "There was an old man, and he had an old cow,
And for to keep her he couldn't tell how,
 
So he built up a barn to kip his cow warm ;
And a liddle more liquor'll do us no harm. "

And now we'll go home and tell our wife
To put in the pot the girt marrow bones,

That we may have porridge when we do cum Joan,
home. "
There was an old man, and he lived in the
West,

The juice of the barrel was what he loved
best.
He loved his auld wife as dear as his life,

But when they got drunk, why, thay soon
cum to strife."
The chorus is repeated after each verse,
and the "Hatfuls, capfuls," given with
great gusto.


I have before me several local versions
of the rhymes sung to the apple-trees, but
the Halse Wassail Song is the most complete,
and owes its preservation, I believe, to Dr. Prior, of Halse, who died last year. It is partly in Somersetshire dialect:
 

The Canadian Magazine,  Ed,: J. Gordon Mowat, John Alexander Cooper, Newton MacTavish, 1907, p.131.

Halse II

Halse Wassail Song."

Wassail, wassail, all round the town,
The zidur-cup is white, and the zidur is brown.
Our zidur is made from good apple trees,
And now, my fine fellows, we'll drink, if you please.
We'll drink your health with all our heart,
We'll drink to "e all before we part.
Here's one, and here's two,
And here's three before we goo.
We're three jolly boys all in a row,
All in a row, boys, all in a row,
And we're three jolly boys all in a row.
This is our wassail, our jolly wassail,
And joy go with our jolly wassail.
Hatfuls, capfuls, dree basket, basketfuls,
And a little heap in under the stairs.

Down in a green copse there sits an old fox,

And there he sits a-mopping his chops.

Shall we go catch him, boys—say, shall we go ?

A thousand to one whor we catch him or no.

There was an old man, and he had an old cow,

And for to keep her he couldn't tell how,

So he bild up a barn to kip his cow warm ;

And a liddle more liquor '11 do us no harm.

And now we'll go whooam, and tell our wife Joan

To put in the pot the girt marrow-bone,

That we may have porridge when we do cum

whooam.

There was an old man, and he lived in the West,
The juice of the barrel war what he loved best.
He loved his ould wife so dear as his life,
But when thay got drunk, why thay soon cum to

strife.

-"Wassailing the Apple Trees." in: Antiquary: A Magazine Devoted to the Study of the Past, Edward Walford, John Charles Cox, George Latimer Apperson E. Stock, 1894, p.122.

 

 

Anglo-Normon Carol

AN ANGLO-NORMAN SONG.

Seignors ore entendez a nus,
De loinz sumes venuz a wous,
Pur quere Noel ;
Car lem nus dit que en cest hostel
Soleit tenir sa feste anuel
A hi cest jur.
Deu doint a tus icels joie d'amurs
Qi a Danz Noel ferunt honors.


Seignors jo vus di por veir
Ke Danz Noel ne velt aveir
Si joie non;
E repleni sa maison,
De payn, de char & de peison,
Por faire honor
Deu doint a tuz ces joie damur.

Seignors il est cri/e en lost,
Qe cil qui despent bien et tost,
E largement;
E fet les granz honors sovent
Deu li duble quanque il despent
Por faire honor.
Deu doint a.

Seignors escriez lea malveis,
Car vus nel les troverez jamels
De bone part:
Botun, batun, ferun gruinard,
Car tot dis a le quer cuuard
Por faire honor.
Deu doint.

Noel beyt bien li vin Engleis
E li Gascoin & li Franceys
E l'Angevin:
Noel fait beivre son veisin.
Si quil se dort, le chief enclin,
Sovent le jor.
Deu doint a tuz cels.

 

Seignors jo vus di par Noel,
E par li sires de cest hostel,
Car bevez ben :
E jo primes beurai le men,
Et pois apres chescon le soen,
Par mon conseil,
Si jo vus di trestoz Wesseyl
Dehaiz eit qui ne dirra Drincheyl !

 

TRANSLATION.

Lordings, from a distant home,

To seek old Christmas we are come,

Who loves our minstrelsy :
And here, unless report mis-say,
The grey-beard dwells; and on this day
Keeps yearly wassel, ever gay,

With festive mirth and glee.

 

To all who honour Christmas, and commend our lays,
Love will his blessings send, and crown with joy their days.*

 

Lordings list, for we tell you true;
Christmas loves the jolly crew

That cloudy care defy :
His liberal board is deftly spread
With manchet loaves and wastel-bread;
His guests with fish and flesh are fed,

Nor lack the stately pye.

 

Lordings, you know that far and near
The saying is, "Who gives good cheer,

And freely spends his treasure;
On him will bounteous heaven bestow
Twice treble blessings here below,
His happy hours shall sweetly flow

In never-ceasing pleasure."

 

Lordings, believe us, knaves abound ;

In every place are flatterers found;

 May all their arts be vain !

But chiefly from these scenes of joy
Chase sordid souls that mirth annoy,
And all who with their base alloy
Turn pleasure into pain.

 

Christmas quaffs our English wines,"
Nor Gascoigne juice, nor French declines,

Nor liquor of Anjou:
He puts th' insidious goblet round,
Till all the guests in sleep are drown'd,
Then wakes 'em with the tabor's sound,

And plays the prank anew.

 

Lordings, it is our host's command,
And Christmas joins him hand in hand,

To drain the brimming bowl:
And I '11 be foremost to obey;
Then pledge me sirs, and drink away,
For Christmas revels here to day,

And sways without control.

 

Now Wassel to you all! and merry may ye be !

But foul that wight befall, who Drinks not Health to me !

**These two lines seem intended, in the original, as a kind of burden or chorus at the end of each stanza; but as they only intrude upon the measure, the translation were perhaps better without them.

*** It was the custom at this time to serve up at entertainments peacock and pheasant pies, the forma of those elegant birds being externally preserved, and much pomp bestowed on their appearance. See what has been already said on this subject in p. 291.

This is a stubborn fact against the opinion of those who maintain that wine was not made in England. See the controversy on this subject in vol. iii.

. It has indeed been the chief purpose in discussing the present subject, to introduce to the reader's notice a composition of this kind, which is perhaps at the same time to be regarded as the most ancient drinking song, composed in England, that is extant. This singular curiosity has been written on a spare leaf in the middle of a valuable miscellaneous manuscript of the fourteenth century, preserved in the British Museum, Bibl. Reg. 16, E. viii. It is probably more than a century older than the manuscript itself, and must have been composed at a time when the Norman language was very familiar in England. In the endeavour to translate it, some difficulties were to be encountered; but it has been an object to preserve the whole and sometimes literal sense of the original, whilst from the nature of the English stanza it was impossible to dispense with amplification.

Illustrations of Shakespeare and of Ancient Manners: With Dissertations on the Clowns and Fools of Shakespeare ; on the Collection of Popular Tales Entitled Gesta Romanorum, and on the English Morris Dance., Francis Douce,T. Tegg, 1839

Anglo Norman Carol Version 2

Lordlings, listen to our lay.
We have come from far away to seek Christmas;
In this mansion we are told,
He his yearly feast doth hold;
'Tis to-day!
May joy come from God above,
To all those who Christmas love.
 
Lordlings, I now tell you true,
Christmas bringeth unto you
Only mirth;
His house he fills with many a dish
Of bread and meat and also fish,
To grace the day.
May joy come from God above,
To all those who Christmas love.
To English ale and Gascon wine,
And French, doth Christmas much incline,
And Anjous too;
He makes his neighbour freely drink,
So that in sleep his head doth sink
Often by day.
May joy come from God above
to all those who Christmas love.
Lords, by Christmas and the host
Of this mansion hear my toast--
Drink it well-
Each must drain his cup of wine,
And I the first will toss off mine;
Thus I advise.
Here then I bid you all Wassail,
Cursed be he that will not say, Drinkhail.
May joy come from God above,
To all those who Christmas love.

- Carols Their Origin, Music and Connection with Mystery Plays, William J Phillip

 

Poor Robin's Washington Irving

The brown bowle,

 The merry brown bowle,

As it goes round about-a,
Fill
Still,

Let the world say what it will,

 And drink your fill all out-a.

The deep canne,

The merry deep canne,

As thou dost freely quaff-a,

Sing  Fling,

Be as merry as a king,
And sound a lusty laugh-a.2

1 " The custom of drinking out of the same cup gave place to each having his cup. When the steward came to the doore with the Wassel, he was to cry three times, Wassel, Wassel, Wassel, and then the chappell (chaplein) was to answer with a song."— Arch^e- Ologia. 2 From Poor Robin's Almanac.

- Washington Irving, Irving's Sketch Book., , Mary Elizabeth Litchfield, Ginn & company, 1901

 

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Quote from Milton
  “I should be loath
     To meet the rudenoss and swilled insolence
     Of such late wassailers.”
     Milton: Comus (The Lady).-Brewer 1984

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Piper's Wallet  CHRISTMAS WASSAIL SONG.

Air: Duncen Gray's come here to wed

 

Hark the kirkbelis cheerlie ring

Christinas tide is comin' 0

 Let us dance an let us sing,

To tabor, pipe, an drumin' 0.

Fill the bowl an then the glass

Wi' lemon punch an brandy 0:

 Ilka lad maun toast his lass

As sweet as sugar candy 0.

 

A' without is cauld an drear,

Wintry winds are howlin' 0

A' within is mirth an cheer:

Dinna then be scwlin' 0.

Housewife set the table roun'

Wi' minced pyes sae daintie 0

Gather'd friends are joyous foun'

Pour y'er Horn o' Plentie 0.

 

Dance wi' me, my cantie jo,

I'll hae nae denial 0,

When Apollo draws the bow

And Venus plays the viol 0.

Marie leads the merry dance ,

Her steps all hearts bewitchiu' 0,

Terpsichore in ha' shall prance

An Phryne in the kitchen 0.

 

Gaffer tells the wodnous tale

Grannie twines the riddle O;

Mirth an Glee can never fail

When Concord tunes the fiddle 0.

Hear the hallow'd waits abroad

Advent carols singing O
A' the choir are on the road

Wi' fife an cymbals ringing O.

 

Fiercer brens the Christmas fire

Monstrous logs consumin' O

Scotia strikes the Lawlan' lyre,

Hielan' pipes are tunin' 0:

Muses nine and Graces three

Smirk their gladden'd faces O,

Momus leads Euphrosyne

To waltz, wi' fond embraces 0.

 

Diogenes then seek y'er tub,

Awa dull Care an Sorrow 0,

Or Poll shall gio ye sic a drub

As ye maun feel the morrow O.

Thistle, Shamrok, Leak, an Rose,

Join beneath the Holly O;

The Missle bough its shade bestows

Above the Wassail jolly 0.

 

Greasy Joan noo keels the pot,
While crabs in pan are hissin' O

The tawsie maunna be forgot,
An then we'll a' be kissin 0.

 Bella squeeze the purplin' bunch,

Silenus decks his waggon 0:

Judie noo maks love to Punch,

While Bacchus drains the flaggon 0.

 

Quips an jokes wi' dimpled smiles

Settle last years quarrels 0,

Casting glaiks the time beguiles

While Jeanie taps the barrels 0.

Games o' " Thread my needle Nan

An " Hunt the Slipper winning 0

Please the bairns whas wee bit span

0' life is just beginning 0.

 

The first wha quits the Jovial board

Before we've drunk the cask all 0

Like Peter wad deny his Lord,

A lapear'd Heathen rascal 0.

We'll nae clap our naightcaps on,

Sae lang as ale is flawin' 0,

But will our Christian calling own,

Though fifty Cocks were crowin' 0.

 

Chorus Of Cocks, Dogs An Cats.

Cock a doodle do,

Bow wow wow,

Miaw Miaw Miaw

3 times.

 

 

The piper's wallet, supplied with the harmony of the muses, in a collection of original songs composed by two literary gentlemen [T.I.M. Forster and R. Norie.].,Thomas Ignatius M. Forster, Robert Norie, 1846

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A Carol for the Eve of St. Mary's Day.

"Virginity Wassail"

 

This is the season when, agreeably to custom,

That it was an honour to send wassail

By the old people who were happy

In their time, and loved pleasure;

And we are now purposing

To be like them, every one merry :

Merry and foolish, youths are wont to be,

Being reproached for squandering abroad,

I know that every mirth will end

Too soon of itself;

Before it is ended, here comes

The wassail of Mary, for the sake of the time ;

N                  ------------ * place the maid immediately

In the chair before us;

.

And let every body in the house be content that we

May drink wassail to virginity,

To remember the time, in faithfulness,

When fair Mary was at the sacrifice,

After the birth to her of a son,

Who delivered every one, through his good will

From their sins, without doubt.

Should there be an inquiry who made the carol,
He is a man whose trust is fully on God,
That he shall go to heaven to the effulgent Mary,
Towards filling the orders where she also is.

Thomas Evans.

* Here the master or mistress of the house was called on by name to officiate.

i' Dyma amscr yr oedd arver
Aurhydedd vod o anvon gwirod.

With the succeeding translation of a Welsh Wassail song, the observer of manners will, perhaps, be pleased. In Welsh, the lines of each couplet, repeated inversely, still keep the same sense.

Ancient Mysteries Described: Especially the English Miracle Plays, Founded on Apocryphal New Testament Story, Extant Among the Unpublished Manuscripts in the British Museum : Including Notices of Ecclesiastical Shows ...,William Hone, W. Hone, 1823, p. 104.

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THE WASSAIL BOWL.-Punch Satire

Good gentles all, Christmas, like Love, is old,

yet ever new : Full eighteen hundred flying yean have left

that saying true. The old Bodleian Wassail Song, a Carol in

Slack Letter, Punch here adapts to instant needs. Can

modern Muse do better ?

 

A Jolly wassail bowl.

A wassail of good ale,
Will warm each drinker's soul.

Hail Christmas ! and all hail
His jolly wassail !

 

Good gentles at our door,

Our wassail we begin.
Good health to rich and poor !

You all are welcome in

To our wassail !

 

Our wassail we do fill

With all that's sound and nice :
We ask you with good will

To taste ; take good advice,

And our good wassail !

 

Without why should ye standing
All shivering in the cold ?

It is our host's command
Ye enter and make bold

With his wassail !

 

Much joy to this our hall
With Christmas enters in,

Punch, just to start the ball,
Will first dip beaker in

To our wassail !

 

He drinks good health all round,

To little and to big, Turn up all taps unsound,

And try a hearty swig,

Of our wassail !

 

Drorj Party Spirit quite,
'lis heavy, neady, stuff,

All men Punch doth invite
To tipple quantum tuff:

Of his wassail !

 

Come, jovial Mr. Bull,

Our spiced bowl you'll try, Of stingo rare 'tis full ;

No head-ache by-and-by

From this wassail !

 

Coy Miss Hibernia stands

Pouting red lips—in vain. Come, Ehln dear, join hands;

You can do nought but gam

From our wassail 1

 

Come, Jonathan, old boss,

And fur-clad Canada,
A right joint bumper toss !

You won't find bitters" pay
Like our wassail !

 

Bismarck, my boy, no doubt
Our tipple is less ' stiff "

Than your champagne and stout.
But let's drown every tiff

In our wassail !

 

No port South African,

Or Sherry of that ilk.
You '11 find therein, old man ;'

Tie strong, yet mild as milk
Is our wassail !


And William too. we hope,

Despite satiric shaft,
You '11 join the genial РОГЕ

In one deep generous draught

Of our wassail !

 

 Boclahgek—drop queer prank ! —

De Lessen—keep up heart ! —

 Whate'er his " flag," each Frank

Is welcome to a part

In our wassail !

 

 Russia and Turkey, too,

And Italy, and Spain, Dutchmen—you like stiff brew ! —

Come all, and take a drain

Of our wassail !

 

 It is a noble part

To bear a liberal mind, And Punch's spacious heart

Holds room for all mankind— So drink wassail !

Good luck betide you all !

One bumper more we '11 fill ; Punch hopes, and ever shall.

For Peace and for Good-will.

That's his wassail!

-Punch, 1888, p.306


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The Tunes
As with folk music everywhere tunes and lyrics join up, change and then change partners! Here are the tunes we have collected thus far. We have provided a few different arrangements of the same  tune. Enjoy!

Wassail tune 1 click hereHere We come a Wassailing (Yorkshire)
Wassail tune 2 click hereGloucestereshire
Wassail tune 3 click here (Vaughn Williams)The Yorkshire Wassail
Wassail tune 4 click here Gloucestereshire
Wassail tune 5 click here Here We come a Wassailing (Yorkshire)
Wassail tune 6 click hereGloucestereshire
Wassail tune 7 click hereHere We come a Wassailing (Yorkshire
Wassail tune 8  click here    or click here  The Gower
Wassail tune 9  click here Yorkshire
Wassail tune 10click here Somerset  Part 1
Wassail tune 11click here Somerset Part 2 Verse 2
Wassail tune 12 click here Somerset Part 3 Verse 5
Wassail tune 13 click here Husk
Wassail tune 14 click here Here we come a Wassailing (Yorkshire)
Wassail tune 15 click here Cornish
Wassail tune 15 click here Homeless
We are working on tune identities!
If you differ with these let us know and we will gladly reconsdier! click to e.mail

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